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From Krisztián Szűcs <szucs.kriszt...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: [PROPOSAL] Consolidate Arrow's CI configuration
Date Thu, 05 Sep 2019 12:22:35 GMT
Hey Uwe,

On Thu, Sep 5, 2019 at 1:49 PM Uwe L. Korn <uwelk@xhochy.com> wrote:

> Hello Krisztián,
>
> I like this proposal. CI coverage and response time is a crucial thing for
> the health of the project. In general I like the consolidation and local
> reproducibility of tge builds. Some questions I wanted to ask to make sure
> I understand your proposal correctly (hopefully they all can be answered
> with a simple yes):
>
> * Windows builds will stay in Appveyor for now?
>
Yes. Afterwards I'd go with the following steps:
1. Port the AppVeyor configurations to buildbot and run them on
    AppVeyor with `ursabot project build windows-builder-name`
2. Once we have windows workers, and they are reliable, we can
    decommission the AppVeyor builds.

> * MacOS builds will stay in Travis?
>
Yes, same as above.

> * All other builds will be removed from Travis?

Not all of the Travis builds are ported to buildbot yet, namely: c_glib,
ruby, and the format integration tests.
I suggest an incremental procedure, if the travis build is ported to
buildbot, we can choose to still run it on travis or we can choose
disable it. In this case Travis would only be a hosting provider.

> * Machines are currently run and funded by UrsaLabs but others could also
> sponsor an instance that could be added to the setup?
>
Exactly, either in the cloud or a bare machines, buildbot enables
us to scale our cluster pretty easily.

> * The build configuration is automatically updated on a merge to master?
>
Not yet, but this can be automatized too with buildbot itself.

>
> And then a not so simple one: What will happen to our current
> docker-compose setup? From the PR it seems like we do similar things with
> ursabot but not using the central docker-compose.yml?
>
Currently we're using docker-compose to run one-off containers rather
than long running, multi-container services (which docker-compose is
designed for). Ursabot already supports the features we need from
docker-compose, so it can effectively replace the docker-compose
setup as well. We have low-level control over the docker API, so we
are able to tailor it to our requirements.

>
>
> Cheers
> Uwe
>
> > Am 29.08.2019 um 14:19 schrieb Krisztián Szűcs <
> szucs.krisztian@gmail.com>:
> >
> > Hi,
> >
> > Arrow's current continuous integration setup utilizes multiple CI
> > providers,
> > tools, and scripts:
> >
> > - Unit tests are running on Travis and Appveyor
> > - Binary packaging builds are running on crossbow, an abstraction over
> > multiple
> >   CI providers driven through a GitHub repository
> > - For local tests and tasks, there is a docker-compose setup, or of
> course
> > you
> >   can maintain your own environment
> >
> > This setup has run into some limitations:
> > - It’s slow: the CI parallelism of Travis has degraded over the last
> > couple of
> >   months. Testing a PR takes more than an hour, which is a long time for
> > both
> >   the maintainers and the contributors, and it has a negative effect on
> > the
> >   development throughput.
> > - Build configurations are not portable, they are tied to specific
> > services.
> >   You can’t just take a Travis script and run it somewhere else.
> > - Because they’re not portable, build configurations are duplicated in
> > several
> >   places.
> > - The Travis, Appveyor and crossbow builds are not reproducible locally,
> > so
> >   developing them requires the slow git push cycles.
> > - Public CI has limited platform support, just for example ARM machines
> > are
> >   not available.
> > - Public CI also has limited hardware support, no GPUs are available
> >
> > Resolving all of the issues above is complicated, but is a must for the
> > long
> > term sustainability of Arrow.
> >
> > For some time, we’ve been working on a tool called Ursabot[1], a library
> on
> > top
> > of the CI framework Buildbot[2]. Buildbot is well maintained and widely
> > used
> > for complex projects, including CPython, Webkit, LLVM, MariaDB, etc.
> > Buildbot
> > is not another hosted CI service like Travis or Appveyor: it is an
> > extensible
> > framework to implement various automations like continuous integration
> > tasks.
> >
> > You’ve probably noticed additional “Ursabot” builds appearing on pull
> > requests,
> > in addition to the Travis and Appveyor builds. We’ve been testing the
> > framework
> > with a fully featured CI server at ci.ursalabs.org. This service runs
> build
> > configurations we can’t run on Travis, does it faster than Travis, and
> has
> > the
> > GitHub comment bot integration for ad hoc build triggering.
> >
> > While we’re not prepared to propose moving all CI to a self-hosted setup,
> > our
> > work has demonstrated the potential of using buildbot to resolve Arrow’s
> > continuous integration challenges:
> > - The docker-based builders are reusing the docker images, which
> eliminate
> >   slow dependency installation steps. Some builds on this setup, run on
> >   Ursa Labs’s infrastructure, run 20 minutes faster than the comparable
> >   Travis-CI jobs.
> > - It’s scalable. We can deploy buildbot wherever and add more masters and
> >   workers, which we can’t do with public CI.
> > - It’s platform and CI-provider independent. Builds can be run on
> > arbitrary
> >   architectures, operating systems, and hardware: Python is the only
> >   requirement. Additionally builds specified in buildbot/ursabot can be
> > run
> >   anywhere: not only on custom buildbot infrastructure but also on
> Travis,
> > or
> >   even on your own machine.
> > - It improves reproducibility and encourages consolidation of
> > configuration.
> >   You can run the exact job locally that ran on Travis, and you can even
> > get
> >   an interactive shell in the build so you can debug a test failure. And
> >   because you can run the same job anywhere, we wouldn’t need to have
> >   duplicated, Travis-specific or the docker-compose build configuration
> > stored
> >   separately.
> > - It’s extensible. More exotic features like a comment bot, benchmark
> >   database, benchmark dashboard, artifact store, integrating other
> systems
> > are
> >   easily implementable within the same system.
> >
> > I’m proposing to donate the build configuration we’ve been iterating on
> in
> > Ursabot to the Arrow codebase. Here [3] is a patch that adds the
> > configuration.
> > This will enable us to explore consolidating build configuration using
> the
> > buildbot framework. A next step after to explore that would be to port a
> > Travis
> > build to Ursabot, and in the Travis configuration, execute the build by
> the
> > shell command `$ ursabot project build <builder-name>`. This is the same
> > way we
> > would be able to execute the build locally--something we can’t currently
> do
> > with the Travis builds.
> >
> > I am not proposing here that we stop using Travis-CI and Appveyor to run
> CI
> > for
> > apache/arrow, though that may well be a direction we choose to go in the
> > future. Moving build configuration into something like buildbot would be
> a
> > necessary first step to do that; that said, there are other immediate
> > benefits
> > to be had by porting build configuration into buildbot: local
> > reproducibility,
> > consolidation of build logic, independence from a particular CI provider,
> > and
> > ease of using and maintaining faster, Docker-based jobs. Self-hosting CI
> > brings
> > a number of other challenges, which we will concurrently continue to
> > explore,
> > but we believe that there are benefits to adopting buildbot build
> > configuration
> > regardless.
> >
> > Regards, Krisztian
> >
> > [1]: https://github.com/ursa-labs/ursabot
> > [2]: https://buildbot.net
> >     https://docs.buildbot.net
> >     https://github.com/buildbot/buildbot
> > [3]: https://github.com/apache/arrow/pull/5210
>
>

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