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From Jacques Nadeau <jacq...@apache.org>
Subject Re: Understanding "shared" memory implications
Date Wed, 16 Mar 2016 21:33:29 GMT
>>You’re hardly the biggest fan of the bundled default execution
implementation. At your bidding, we’ve been trying for almost 2 years to
get that stuff out of core.

Great point. As you stated, I think there are at least two lessons with
Calcite:

1. Make sure to have an easy to use out of the box initial integration so
people can get moving quickly.
2. Make sure to build a modular set of components so that advanced users
can consume only the pieces that they want.

The Calcite community (and Julian) have done a great job of (1) and that
has led to great adoption. (2) has been harder in that example because it
wasn't an initial design goal.

For Arrow, let's make sure that we do our best to accomplish both (1) and
(2). They seem like entirely compatible goals.



On Wed, Mar 16, 2016 at 10:54 AM, Julian Hyde <jhyde@apache.org> wrote:

> Calcite is a salutary example if what happens if you *don’t* figure out
> early enough what is core and what is not. You’re hardly the biggest fan of
> the bundled default execution implementation. At your bidding, we’ve been
> trying for almost 2 years to get that stuff out of core.
>
> Arrow is, at its core, a memory format and APIs for creating/consuming
> that format. I think (hope) that the core can make reasonable assumptions
> such as that there are either multiple reader threads or a single writer
> thread. For that I suppose it will need a memory model.
>
> And yes, the core should deliver something that will solve Corey’s use
> case, e.g. being able to pass memory between processes without copying.
>
> But all of the stuff that involves complex moving parts should be kept
> very clearly out of core (in optional components or sample code) so that
> people can bring their own favorite complex moving parts to Arrow.
>
> Julian
>
>
> > On Mar 16, 2016, at 10:34 AM, Jacques Nadeau <jacques@apache.org> wrote:
> >
> > I think it is okay for a project to be different things to different
> > people.
> >
> > I think it is really important as a library that we have enough
> supporting
> > examples that people can get started quickly. In some sense I'm modeling
> > this after what Julian did with Calcite.  For example he provides a
> default
> > execution implementation to get started with but you don't need to use
> it.
> > I think this helps new users get started and have something working
> sooner.
> > It doesn't mean that a particular consumer needs to adopt that
> > implementation. In fact, many don't.
> >
> > So my goal is to provide an example implementation of sharing across IPC
> > and rpc. Once there is something to play with, we can figure out what
> > pieces are 'core' arrow and what pieces are example implementations.
> > I always thought Arrow was just an in-memory format, and it is the
> > responsibility of whoever else that want to use it to carry that
> > responsibilities out, because depending on workloads, different
> frameworks
> > might pick very different applications. Otherwise it seems to be doing
> too
> > much and having too strong of an opinion about data sharing in a format
> > that's primarily about data sharing.
> >
> > On Wed, Mar 16, 2016 at 10:03 AM, Corey Nolet <cjnolet@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >> I've been under the impression that exposing memory to be shared
> directly
> >> and not copied WAS, in fact, the responsibility of Arrow. In fact, I
> read
> >> this in [1] and this is turned me on to Arrow in the first place.
> >>
> >>
> >> [1]
> >>
> >>
> >
> http://www.datanami.com/2016/02/17/arrow-aims-to-defrag-big-in-memory-analytics/
> >>
> >> On Wed, Mar 16, 2016 at 1:00 PM, Julian Hyde <jhyde@apache.org> wrote:
> >>
> >>> This is all very interesting stuff, but just so we’re clear: it is not
> >>> Arrow’s responsibility to provide an RPC/IPC/LPC mechanism, nor
> >> facilities
> >>> for resource management. If we DID decide to make this Arrow’s
> >>> responsibility it would overlap with other components which specialize
> > in
> >>> such stuff.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>> On Mar 16, 2016, at 9:49 AM, Jacques Nadeau <jacques@apache.org>
> >> wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>> @Todd: agree entirely on prototyping design. My goal is throw out some
> >>>> ideas and some POC code and then we can explore from there.
> >>>>
> >>>> My main thoughts have initially been around lifecycle management. I've
> >>> done
> >>>> some work previously where a consistently sized shared buffer using
> >> mmap
> >>>> has improved performance. This is more complicated given the
> >> requirements
> >>>> for providing collaborative allocation and cross process reference
> >>> counts.
> >>>>
> >>>> With regards to whether this is more generally applicable: I think it
> >>> could
> >>>> ultimately be more general but I suggest we focus on the particular
> >>>> application of moving long-lived arrow record batches between a
> >> producer
> >>>> and a consumer initially. Constraining the problems seems like we will
> >>> get
> >>>> to something workable sooner. We can abstract to a more general
> >> solution
> >>> as
> >>>> there are other clear requirements.
> >>>>
> >>>> With regards to capnproto, I believe they are simply saying when they
> >>> talk
> >>>> about zero-copy shared memory that the structure supports that (same
> > as
> >>> any
> >>>> memory-layout based design). I don't believe they actually implemented
> >> a
> >>>> protocol and multi-language implementation for zero-copy cross process
> >>>> communication.
> >>>>
> >>>> One other note to make here is that my goal here is not just about
> >>>> performance but also about memory footprint. Being able to have a
> >> shared
> >>>> memory protocol that allows multiple tools to interact with the same
> >> hot
> >>>> dataset.
> >>>>
> >>>> RE: ACL, for the initial focus, I suggest that we consider the two
> >>> sharing
> >>>> processes are "trusted" and expect the initial Arrow API reference
> >>>> implementations to manage memory access.
> >>>>
> >>>> Regarding other questions that Todd threw out:
> >>>>
> >>>> - if you are using an mmapped file in /dev/shm/, how do you make sure
> >> it
> >>>> gets cleaned up if the process crashes?
> >>>>
> >>>>>> Agreed that it needs to get resolve. If I recall, destruction
can be
> >>>> applied once associated process are attached to memory and this allows
> >>> the
> >>>> kernel to recover once all attaching processes are destroyed. If this
> >>> isn't
> >>>> enough, then we may very well need a simple  external coordinator.
> >>>>
> >>>> - how do you allocate memory to it? there's nothing ensuring that
> >>> /dev/shm
> >>>> doesn't swap out if you try to put too much in there, and then your
> >>>> in-memory super-fast access will basically collapse under swap
> >> thrashing
> >>>>
> >>>>>> Simplest model initially is probably one where we assume a master
> >> and a
> >>>> slave. (Ideally negotiated on initial connection.) The master is
> >>>> responsible for allocating memory and giving that to the slave. The
> >>> master
> >>>> then is responsible for managing reasonable memory allocation limits
> >> just
> >>>> like any other. Slaves that need to allocated memory must ask the
> >> master
> >>>> (at whatever chunk makes sense) and will get rejected if they are too
> >>>> aggressive. (this probably means that at any point an IPC can fall
> > back
> >>> to
> >>>> RPC??)
> >>>>
> >>>> - how do you do lifecycle management across the two processes? If,
> > say,
> >>>> Kudu wants to pass a block of data to some Python program, how does
it
> >>> know
> >>>> when the Python program is done reading it and it should be deleted?
> >> What
> >>>> if the python program crashed in the middle - when can Kudu release
> > it?
> >>>>
> >>>>>> My thinking, as mentioned earlier, is a shared reference count
model
> >>> for
> >>>> complex situations. Possibly a "request/response" ownership model for
> >>>> simpler cases.
> >>>>
> >>>> - how do you do security? If both sides of the connection don't trust
> >>> each
> >>>> other, and use length prefixes and offsets, you have to be constantly
> >>>> validating and re-validating everything you read.
> >>>>
> >>>> I'm suggesting that we start with trusting so we don't get too wrapped
> >> up
> >>>> in all the extra complexities of security. My experience with these
> >>> things
> >>>> is that a lot of users will frequently pick performance or footprint
> >> over
> >>>> security for quite some time. For example, if I recall correctly, on
> >> the
> >>>> shared file descriptor model that was initially implemented in the
> > HDFS
> >>>> client, that people used short-circuit reads for years before security
> >>> was
> >>>> correctly implemented. (Am I remembering this right?)
> >>>>
> >>>> Lastly, as I mentioned above, I don't think there should be any
> >>> requirement
> >>>> that Arrow communication be limited to only 'IPC'. As Todd points out,
> >> in
> >>>> many cases unix domain sockets will be just fine.
> >>>>
> >>>> We need to implement both models because we all know that locality
> > will
> >>>> never be guaranteed. The IPC design/implementation needs to be good
> > for
> >>>> anything to make into arrow.
> >>>>
> >>>> thanks
> >>>> Jacques
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> On Wed, Mar 16, 2016 at 8:54 AM, Zhe Zhang <zhz@apache.org> wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>> I have similar concerns as Todd stated below. With an mmap-based
> >>> approach,
> >>>>> we are treating shared memory objects like files. This brings in
all
> >>>>> filesystem related considerations like ACL and lifecycle mgmt.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Stepping back a little, the shared-memory work isn't really specific
> >> to
> >>>>> Arrow. A few questions related to this:
> >>>>> 1) Has the topic been discussed in the context of protobuf (or other
> >> IPC
> >>>>> protocols) before? Seems Cap'n Proto (https://capnproto.org/) has
> >>>>> zero-copy
> >>>>> shared memory. I haven't read implementation detail though.
> >>>>> 2) If the shared-memory work benefits a wide range of protocols,
> >> should
> >>> it
> >>>>> be a generalized and standalone library?
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Thanks,
> >>>>> Zhe
> >>>>>
> >>>>> On Tue, Mar 15, 2016 at 8:30 PM Todd Lipcon <todd@cloudera.com>
> >> wrote:
> >>>>>
> >>>>>> Having thought about this quite a bit in the past, I think the
> >>> mechanics
> >>>>> of
> >>>>>> how to share memory are by far the easiest part. The much harder
> > part
> >>> is
> >>>>>> the resource management and ownership. Questions like:
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> - if you are using an mmapped file in /dev/shm/, how do you
make
> > sure
> >>> it
> >>>>>> gets cleaned up if the process crashes?
> >>>>>> - how do you allocate memory to it? there's nothing ensuring
that
> >>>>> /dev/shm
> >>>>>> doesn't swap out if you try to put too much in there, and then
your
> >>>>>> in-memory super-fast access will basically collapse under swap
> >>> thrashing
> >>>>>> - how do you do lifecycle management across the two processes?
If,
> >> say,
> >>>>>> Kudu wants to pass a block of data to some Python program, how
does
> >> it
> >>>>> know
> >>>>>> when the Python program is done reading it and it should be
deleted?
> >>> What
> >>>>>> if the python program crashed in the middle - when can Kudu
release
> >> it?
> >>>>>> - how do you do security? If both sides of the connection don't
> > trust
> >>>>> each
> >>>>>> other, and use length prefixes and offsets, you have to be
> > constantly
> >>>>>> validating and re-validating everything you read.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Another big factor is that shared memory is not, in my experience,
> >>>>>> immediately faster than just copying data over a unix domain
socket.
> >> In
> >>>>>> particular, the first time you read an mmapped file, you'll
end up
> >>> paying
> >>>>>> minor page fault overhead on every page. This can be improved
with
> >>>>>> HugePages, but huge page mmaps are not supported yet in current
> > Linux
> >>>>> (work
> >>>>>> going on currently to address this). So you're left with hugetlbfs,
> >>> which
> >>>>>> involves static allocations and much more pain.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> All the above is a long way to say: let's make sure we do the
write
> >>>>>> prototyping and up-front design before jumping into code.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> -Todd
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> On Tue, Mar 15, 2016 at 5:54 PM, Jacques Nadeau <jacques@apache.org
> >
> >>>>>> wrote:
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>> @Corey
> >>>>>>> The POC Steven and Wes are working on is based on MappedBuffer
but
> >> I'm
> >>>>>>> looking at using netty's fork of tcnative to use shared
memory
> >>>>> directly.
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> @Yiannis
> >>>>>>> We need to have both RPC and a shared memory mechanisms
(what I'm
> >>>>>> inclined
> >>>>>>> to call IPC but is a specific kind of IPC). The idea is
we
> > negotiate
> >>>>> via
> >>>>>>> RPC and then if we determine shared locality, we work over
shared
> >>>>> memory
> >>>>>>> (preferably for both data and control). So the system interacting
> >> with
> >>>>>>> HBase in your example would be the one responsible for placing
> >>>>> collocated
> >>>>>>> execution to take advantage of IPC.
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> How do others feel of my redefinition of IPC to mean the
same
> > memory
> >>>>>> space
> >>>>>>> communication (either via shared memory or rdma) versus
RPC as
> >> socket
> >>>>>> based
> >>>>>>> communication?
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> On Tue, Mar 15, 2016 at 5:38 PM, Corey Nolet <cjnolet@gmail.com>
> >>>>> wrote:
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> I was seeing Netty's unsafe classes being used here,
not mapped
> >> byte
> >>>>>>>> buffer  not sure if that statement is completely correct
but I'll
> >>>>> have
> >>>>>> to
> >>>>>>>> dog through the code again to figure that out.
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> The more I was looking at unsafe, it makes sense why
that would be
> >>>>>>>> used.apparently it's also supposed to be included on
Java 9 as a
> >>>>> first
> >>>>>>>> class API
> >>>>>>>> On Mar 15, 2016 7:03 PM, "Wes McKinney" <wes@cloudera.com>
wrote:
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>> My understanding is that you can use java.nio.MappedByteBuffer
to
> >>>>>> work
> >>>>>>>>> with memory-mapped files as one way to share memory
pages between
> >>>>>> Java
> >>>>>>>>> (and non-Java) processes without copying.
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>> I am hoping that we can reach a POC of zero-copy
Arrow memory
> >>>>> sharing
> >>>>>>>>> Java-to-Java and Java-to-C++ in the near future.
Indeed this will
> >>>>>> have
> >>>>>>>>> huge implications once we get it working end to
end (for example,
> >>>>>>>>> receiving memory from a Java process in Python without
a heavy
> >>>>> ser-de
> >>>>>>>>> step -- it's what we've always dreamed of) and with
the metadata
> >>>>> and
> >>>>>>>>> shared memory control flow standardized.
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>> - Wes
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>> On Wed, Mar 9, 2016 at 9:25 PM, Corey J Nolet <cjnolet@gmail.com
> >
> >>>>>>> wrote:
> >>>>>>>>>> If I understand correctly, Arrow is using Netty
underneath which
> >>>>> is
> >>>>>>>>> using Sun's Unsafe API in order to allocate direct
byte buffers
> >> off
> >>>>>>> heap.
> >>>>>>>>> It is using Netty to communicate between "client"
and "server",
> >>>>>>>> information
> >>>>>>>>> about memory addresses for data that is being requested.
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> I've never attempted to use the Unsafe API to
access off heap
> >>>>>> memory
> >>>>>>>>> that has been allocated in one JVM from another
JVM but I'm
> >>>>> assuming
> >>>>>>> this
> >>>>>>>>> must be the case in order to claim that the memory
is being
> >>>>> accessed
> >>>>>>>>> directly without being copied, correct?
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> The implication here is huge. If the memory
is being directly
> >>>>>> shared
> >>>>>>>>> across processes by them being allowed to directly
reach into the
> >>>>>>> direct
> >>>>>>>>> byte buffers, that's true shared memory. Otherwise,
if there's
> >>>>> copies
> >>>>>>>> going
> >>>>>>>>> on, it's less appealing.
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> Thanks.
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> Sent from my iPad
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> --
> >>>>>> Todd Lipcon
> >>>>>> Software Engineer, Cloudera
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
>
>

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