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From maart...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r1036229 - in /ant/ivy/site: choose-distrib.html download.html faq.html features.html links.html m2comparison.html toc.json
Date Wed, 17 Nov 2010 21:15:20 GMT
Author: maartenc
Date: Wed Nov 17 21:15:18 2010
New Revision: 1036229

URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc?rev=1036229&view=rev
Log:
Added TM symbols after every first occurrence of 'Apache Ant' and 'Apache Maven' + some minor
improvements (IVY-1249)

Modified:
    ant/ivy/site/choose-distrib.html
    ant/ivy/site/download.html
    ant/ivy/site/faq.html
    ant/ivy/site/features.html
    ant/ivy/site/links.html
    ant/ivy/site/m2comparison.html
    ant/ivy/site/toc.json

Modified: ant/ivy/site/choose-distrib.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/choose-distrib.html?rev=1036229&r1=1036228&r2=1036229&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/choose-distrib.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/choose-distrib.html Wed Nov 17 21:15:18 2010
@@ -30,13 +30,14 @@ Each distribution of Apache Ivy™ co
 With each version of Apache Ivy, you can find:
 <h2>binary distribution</h2>
 Containing jars, documentation and examples + a build.xml to download dependencies from a
maven2 repository.
-This is the recommended version to use Apache Ivy, you will get the jar and be able to make
your first use of Apache Ivy to download the dependencies you need. All dependencies are optional,
so you can use Apache Ivy without downloading any dependency. It requires at least a jre 1.4+
to run, and it can be used with Ant 1.6.2 or later.
+
+This is the recommended version to use Apache Ivy, you will get the jar and be able to make
your first use of Apache Ivy to download the dependencies you need. All dependencies are optional,
so you can use Apache Ivy without downloading any dependency. It requires at least a jre 1.4+
to run, and it can be used with Apache Ant&#153; 1.6.2 or later.
 <h2>binary distribution with dependencies</h2>
 Containing jars, dependencies, documentation and examples.
-This version is well suited if you want to easily use Apache Ivy with all its optional tasks
relying on external dependencies, without having to download them later. It requires at least
a jre 1.4+ to run, and it can be used with Ant 1.6.2 or later.
+
+This distribution is well suited if you want to easily use Apache Ivy with all its optional
tasks relying on external dependencies, without having to download them later. It requires
at least a jre 1.4+ to run, and it can be used with Apache Ant 1.6.2 or later.
 <h2>sources</h2>
-Ready to be build with Ant 1.6.2 or later. You will need to have an internet access during
the build in order to get Apache Ivy download its dependencies from the repository.
-This is the recommended version if you want to build Apache Ivy yourself and see it in action
at the same time.
+Ready to be build with Apache Ant 1.6.2 or later. You will need to have an internet access
during the build in order to get Apache Ivy download its dependencies from the repository.
This is the recommended version if you want to build Apache Ivy yourself and see it in action
at the same time.
 </textarea>
 <script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>
 </body>

Modified: ant/ivy/site/download.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/download.html?rev=1036229&r1=1036228&r2=1036229&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/download.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/download.html Wed Nov 17 21:15:18 2010
@@ -73,7 +73,7 @@ What you can get here at the ASF is the 
 <code>
 svn co https://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/ant/ivy/core/trunk ivy
 </code>
-Then to build Apache Ivy from source, assuming you have ant 1.6.2+ and a jdk 1.4+ installed,
then you only need to run the following command:
+Then to build Apache Ivy from source, assuming you have Apache Ant&#153; 1.6.2+ and a
jdk 1.4+ installed, then you only need to run the following command:
 <code>
 ant jar
 </code>
@@ -82,12 +82,12 @@ Then you will find ivy.jar in <b>build/a
 <h2>Snapshot build</h2>
 The Apache Software Foundation hosts an installation of the Hudson CI-system where a continuous
build of Ivy is available. Note that these are not official builds and they are not endorsed
or even supported by the Apache Ivy team. But if you have problems with testing the latest
(successful) build, you are welcome to post that on the mailinglist. 
 
-The project page of Ivy on this Hudson installation is: http://hudson.zones.apache.org/hudson/view/Ant/job/Ivy.
Here you can find links to the latest version of the jars.
+The project page of Apache Ivy on this Hudson installation is: http://hudson.zones.apache.org/hudson/view/Ant/job/Ivy.
Here you can find links to the latest version of the jars.
 
 <h2><a name="VerifyReleases">Verify Releases</a></h2>
 It is essential that you verify the integrity of the downloaded files using the PGP signature
or the SHA1 or MD5 checksums.  The checksums are not as strong indicators as the PGP signature.
 
-The PGP signatures can be verified using PGP or GPG.  First download the <a href="http://www.apache.org/dist/ant/KEYS">KEYS</a>
as well as the asc signature file for the particular distribution.  Make sure you get these
files from the <a href="http://www.apache.org/dist/ant/ivy/">main distribution directory</a>,
rather than from a mirror. Then verify the signatures using
+The PGP signatures can be verified using PGP or GPG. First download the <a href="http://www.apache.org/dist/ant/KEYS">KEYS</a>
as well as the asc signature file for the particular distribution.  Make sure you get these
files from the <a href="http://www.apache.org/dist/ant/ivy/">main distribution directory</a>,
rather than from a mirror. Then verify the signatures using
 
 <code>
 % pgpk -a KEYS

Modified: ant/ivy/site/faq.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/faq.html?rev=1036229&r1=1036228&r2=1036229&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/faq.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/faq.html Wed Nov 17 21:15:18 2010
@@ -26,51 +26,47 @@
 <body>
 	<textarea id="xooki-source">
 <h1>What and Why</h1>
-<h2><a name="what-is-ivy"></a>What is Apache Ivy ?</h2>
+<h2><a name="what-is-ivy"></a>What is Apache Ivy&#153 ?</h2>
 <p>Apache Ivy&#153; is a powerful dependencies manager with transitive dependencies
support and much more <a href="features.html">features</a>.</p>
 <p>With Apache Ivy you define the dependencies of your module in an xml file, called
an ivy-file. Then you usually ask Apache Ivy to retrieve your dependencies to a local lib
dir, and it does it for you by locating the artifacts of your dependencies in repositories,
such as a maven2 repository for instance.</p>
 <h2><a name="why-should-i-use-a-dependencies-manager"></a>Why should I
use a dependencies manager ?</h2>
-<p>Without a dependencies manager, two solutions are often used to store the dependencies
of a project: a project lib dir or direct access to a shared repository.<br />
-The major drawback of the project lib dir is that the same dependencies are stored in multiple
location if you have several projects using the same dependencies. Moreover, we often see
project where dependencies revisions are not documented, which can cause problems for maintenance.<br
/>
+<p>Without a dependencies manager, two solutions are often used to store the dependencies
of a project: a project lib dir or direct access to a shared repository.</p>
+<p>The major drawback of the project lib dir is that the same dependencies are stored
in multiple location if you have several projects using the same dependencies. Moreover, we
often see project where dependencies revisions are not documented, which can cause problems
for maintenance.<br />
 With the shared repository the problem is often to maintain the list of dependencies of the
project. This list is often lost within the build file, which does not help maintenance. Moreover,
this solution often requires a download of the whole repository, unless home made dependencies
management solution has been used.</p>
-<p>Finally, the major drawback of these solutions is that they do not use transitive
dependencies. Transitive dependencies are the dependencies of your dependencies. Managing
transitive dependencies  let you declare dependencies only on what you really need, and not
what the module you use themselves need. This not only eases your dependencies declaration,
but it also improves a lot the maintenability of your project, especially in multi-project
environment. Imagine you develop a component used in several other projects. Then each time
your component needs a new dependency, without transitive dependencies, you have to update
all the projects using your component ! And this could really take a lot of time !</p>
+<p>Another major drawback of these solutions is that they do not use transitive dependencies.
Transitive dependencies are the dependencies of your dependencies. Managing transitive dependencies
 let you declare dependencies only on what you really need, and not what the module you use
themselves need. This not only eases your dependencies declaration, but it also improves a
lot the maintenability of your project, especially in multi-project environment. Imagine you
develop a component used in several other projects. Then each time your component needs a
new dependency, without transitive dependencies, you have to update all the projects using
your component ! And this could really take a lot of time !</p>
 <h2><a name="why-should-i-use-ivy"></a>Why should I use Apache Ivy ?</h2>
 <p>If you are convinced of using a dependencies manager, you may wonder why using Apache
Ivy and not another tool. We are not able to answer this question without being biased, but
have a look at Apache Ivy <a href="features.html">features</a> and the [[m2comparison
product comparison]] we provide, and you will certainly see that Apache Ivy is one of the
best dependencies manager currently available ;-)</p>
-<h2><a name="how-does-ivy-differ-from-maven-2"></a>How does Apache Ivy
differ from Apache Maven ?</h2>
+<h2><a name="how-does-ivy-differ-from-maven-2"></a>How does Apache Ivy
differ from Apache Maven&#153; ?</h2>
 <p>The answer to this question is too long, so it deserves its own page <a href="m2comparison.html">here</a>.</p>
 <h1>Apache Ivy in use</h1>
 <h2><a name="i-dont-understand-whats-happening"></a>I don't understand
what's happening...</h2>
-<p>The first thing to do when you don't understand what's going wrong is to try to
change the message level. If you use Apache Ant, you can use the -debug or -verbose options
to get more detailed messages and better understand what's happening.</p>
+<p>The first thing to do when you don't understand what's going wrong is to try to
change the message level. If you use Apache Ant&#153;, you can use the -debug or -verbose
options to get more detailed messages and better understand what's happening.</p>
 <h2><a name="ivy-seems-to-fail-connecting"></a>Apache Ivy seems to fail
connecting to ibiblio...</h2>
-<p>First, check if the ibiblio site is ok with your favorite browser. If the site is
ok, maybe it's a problem of proxy configuration. Set your ANT_OPTS environment variable to
configure your proxy if you have one.<br />
-For instance:<br />
+<p>First, check if the ibiblio site is ok with your favorite browser. If the site is
ok, maybe it's a problem of proxy configuration. Set your ANT_OPTS environment variable to
configure your proxy if you have one.</p>
+<p>For instance:
 <code>set ANT_OPTS=-Dhttp.proxyHost=myproxy -Dhttp.proxyPort=3128</code>
 Or for authenticated proxy:
 <code>set ANT_OPTS=-Dhttp.proxyHost=myproxyhost -Dhttp.proxyPort=8080 -Dhttp.proxyUserName=myproxyusername
-Dhttp.proxyPassword=myproxypassword -Dhttps.proxyHost=myproxyhost -Dhttps.proxyPort=8080</code>
 </p>
 <p>If it still doesn't work, maybe it's your dependency file which is not ok. Check
if the module name you depend on is actually a name of directory under
-<a href="http://www.ibiblio.org/maven/" title="www.ibiblio.org/maven/">www.ibiblio.org/maven/</a>.
If this is the case, check if the jar with a name like [module]-[revision].jar is present
under the jars directory of this module on ibiblio.<br />
-For instance: <a href="http://www.ibiblio.org/maven/commons-httpclient/jars/commons-httpclient-2.0.jar"
title="www.ibiblio.org/maven/commons-httpclient/jars/commons-httpclient-2.0.jar">www.ibiblio.org/maven/commons-httpclient/jars/commons-httpclient-2.0.jar</a></p>
+<a href="http://www.ibiblio.org/maven/" title="www.ibiblio.org/maven/">www.ibiblio.org/maven/</a>.
If this is the case, check if the jar with a name like [module]-[revision].jar is present
under the jars directory of this module on ibiblio. For instance: <a href="http://www.ibiblio.org/maven/commons-httpclient/jars/commons-httpclient-2.0.jar"
title="www.ibiblio.org/maven/commons-httpclient/jars/commons-httpclient-2.0.jar">www.ibiblio.org/maven/commons-httpclient/jars/commons-httpclient-2.0.jar</a></p>
 <p>If this is the case, check your configuration to see if you actually use the ibiblio
resolver.</p>
-<p>Finally, you can check if the files were not downloaded but corrupted by checking
your lib directory and opening the jars if any with an unzip program. Apache Ivy has sha1/md5
checking, but not all repositories contains such checksums.</p>
-<p>If you still have problems post your issue on the [[mailing-lists]] 
-mentioning your OS, your version of Apache Ant, your version of Apache Ivy, your configuration
file and your ivy-file.</p>
+<p>Finally, you can check if the files were downloaded but corrupted by checking your
lib directory and opening the jars if any with an unzip program. Apache Ivy has sha1/md5 checking,
but not all repositories contains such checksums.</p>
+<p>If you still have problems post your issue on the [[mailing-lists]] mentioning your
OS, your version of Apache Ant, your version of Apache Ivy, your configuration file and your
ivy-file.</p>
 <h2><a name="ivy-fails-to-get-an-artifact"></a>Apache Ivy fails to get
an artifact on my http server. What's wrong?</h2>
 <p>The first thing to do is to ensure the setting is correct. Apache Ivy should log
the url it tried, copy this url and paste it in your favorite browser, and verify you get
no error.</p>
 <p>If this is ok, check if you don't need any proxy setting nor authentication. For
proxy setting, you can use for instance this:<br />
-<code>set ANT_OPTS=-Dhttp.proxyHost=myproxy -Dhttp.proxyPort=3128</code><br
/>
+<code>set ANT_OPTS=-Dhttp.proxyHost=myproxy -Dhttp.proxyPort=3128</code>
 Or for authenticated proxy:
 <code>set ANT_OPTS=-Dhttp.proxyHost=myproxyhost -Dhttp.proxyPort=8080 -Dhttp.proxyUserName=myproxyusername
-Dhttp.proxyPassword=myproxypassword -Dhttps.proxyHost=myproxyhost -Dhttps.proxyPort=8080</code>
 For http authentication, fill in the appropriate data at [[doc:use/configure configuration]]
time.</p>
-<p>If you still have no idea of what is wrong, then I suggest to use commons-httpclient
if it isn't already the case (you should just put commons-httpclient in you classpath), and
then <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/httpclient/logging.html">turn on the
debug logging</a>.</p>
-<p>You will then have very detailed information on how your url is handled. If you
still have problem, ask for help on the [[mailing-lists]].</p>
+<p>If you still have no idea of what is wrong, then I suggest to use commons-httpclient
if it isn't already the case (you should just put commons-httpclient in you classpath), and
then <a href="http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/httpclient/logging.html">turn on the
debug logging</a>. You will then have very detailed information on how your url is handled.
If you still have problem, ask for help on the [[mailing-lists]].</p>
 <h2><a name="getting-rid-of-lib-directory"></a>What if I do not want to
put my library files in the lib directory ? </h2>
 <p>No problem, you just have to set an ant property:</p>
 <code><property name="ivy.lib.dir" value="pathtomylibdir"/></code>
 <h2><a name="getting-rid-of-revision"></a>What if I do not want the revision
of the files I retrieve to appear in the file name ?</h2>
 <p>A typical question for people using an IDE like eclipse and often changing dependency
revision: it's a bit boring to change your IDE project just to tell
-him to use comp-build2596.jar instead of comp-build2595.jar, when you have
-already changed your ivy file (and even if you haven't changed it, if you use the continuous
integration feature !). No problem, you have a total control on the files retrieved using
the pattern attribute in the retrieve task:</p>
+him to use comp-build2596.jar instead of comp-build2595.jar, when you have already changed
your ivy file (and even if you haven't changed it, if you use the continuous integration feature
!). No problem, you have a total control on the files retrieved using the pattern attribute
in the retrieve task:</p>
 <p>Here is the default pattern:</p>
 <code><ivy:retrieve pattern="${ivy.lib.dir}/[artifact]-[revision].[ext]"/></code>
 <p>And here is one which do not suffix file name with dependency revision:</p>
@@ -80,16 +76,15 @@ already changed your ivy file (and even 
 <p>Not too difficult, and really flexible, isn't it ? And check the retrieve task reference
documentation to learn more about it...</p>
 <h2><a name="why-two-xml-files"></a>Why two xml files ?</h2>
 <p>Apache Ivy uses two types of xml files: configuration files and ivy files.</p>
-<p>In fact, Apache Ivy distinguishes two different steps to describe and get your dependencies:<br
/>
-You write ivy files to describe the dependencies of your module, independently of how you
retrieve them.<br />
-Then you configure Apache Ivy to indicate where it can find your dependencies. Thus you can
easily share your ivy files, even if you have internal dependencies which are not resolved
the same way in your environment as in the target development environment. You just need to
write two configuration files, one in your default development environment, and one in the
target development environment with the <b>same ivy files</b>. </p>
+<p>In fact, Apache Ivy distinguishes two different steps to describe and get your dependencies:</p>
+<ul><li>You write ivy files to describe the dependencies of your module, independently
of how you retrieve them.</li>
+<li>Then you configure Apache Ivy to indicate where it can find your dependencies.
Thus you can easily share your ivy files, even if you have internal dependencies which are
not resolved the same way in your environment as in the target development environment. You
just need to write two configuration files, one in your default development environment, and
one in the target development environment with the <b>same ivy files</b>.</li></ul>
 <h2><a name="how-do-i-separate-dependencies"></a>How do I separate the
dependencies I need at xxx time and the one I need at yyy time ?</h2>
 <p>Apache Ivy uses a concept called <i>configurations</i> to handle this,
and many more. As explained in the [[doc:terminology terminology page]], a <i>configuration</i>
of your module can be thought as a way to use your module (<i>note: this has nothing
to do with the configuration of Apache Ivy itself, through the use of configuration file</i>).
You can describe what dependencies are needed in each configuration. </p>
 <p>Moreover, because the dependencies are modules too, they can also have configurations.
What is extremely powerful with Apache Ivy is that you can define configurations mapping,
i.e. which conf of the dependency is needed in which conf of your module. Thus what is needed
at 'runtime' of a dependency can be needed for 'test' of your module.</p>
 <p>Finally, the configurations are unlimited, defined in each module, and can extend
each other. This contributes a lot to the flexibility of Apache Ivy.</p>
 <h2><a name="no-artifact"></a>Can I write an ivy file for a module with
no artifact at all ?</h2>
-<p>Yes, this is what is called a 'virtual' module.</p>
-<p>Having a module which has no publication and only dependencies can be useful in
many cases. </p>
+<p>Yes, this is what is called a 'virtual' module. Having a module which has no publication
and only dependencies can be useful in many cases. </p>
 <p>In particular, you can in this way define a set of dependencies used in several
projects. Once defined, you can simply add a dependency on this virtual module to get all
its dependencies, thanks to transitive dependencies management.</p>
 <p>It can also be useful if you want to define a flexible framework. In your framework,
you will certainly have several modules, each having its own dependencies. But for the users
of your framework, it can be interesting to provide a virtual module, representing the framework
as a whole, and using configurations to let the user choose what he really wants to use in
your framework, in a very flexible and effective way.</p>
 <p>But the problem is that Apache Ivy considers by default that a module publishes
one artifact, with the same name as the module itself. So the way to define a virtual module
is to add to its ivy file a publications section with no publication inside:</p>
@@ -103,7 +98,7 @@ Then you configure Apache Ivy to indicat
 <p>This the default behaviour of Apache Ivy, which relies on the revision and on its
cache to avoid too many downloads. However, this can be changed on each resolver using the
<em>checkmodified</em> attribute, or globally by setting <em>ivy.resolver.default.check.modified</em>
variable to true.</p>
 <h1>Misc</h1>
 <h2><a name="release-notes"></a>Where are the release notes ?</h2>
-<p>Release notes can be found in the [[doc/index documentation]].</p>
+<p>Release notes can be found in the [[doc:index documentation]].</p>
 <h2><a name="more-information"></a>Where can I get more information?</h2>
 <p>If you need more information about Ivy than the one found in the documentation,
you can see the <a href="links.html">links</a> page, use the [[mailing-lists]]
to ask your question to the community, or use your favorite search engine.<br />
 For search engine search, we advise to use ivy + ant or java as base keywords, since ivy
alone is a very common word.</p></textarea>

Modified: ant/ivy/site/features.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/features.html?rev=1036229&r1=1036228&r2=1036229&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/features.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/features.html Wed Nov 17 21:15:18 2010
@@ -25,14 +25,14 @@
 </head>
 <body>
 	<textarea id="xooki-source">
-<p>Apache Ivy&#153; is a very powerful dependency manager oriented toward Java
dependency management, even though it could be used to manage dependencies of any kind.</p>
+<p>Apache Ivy&#153; is a very powerful dependency manager oriented toward Java&#153;
dependency management, even though it could be used to manage dependencies of any kind.</p>
 <p>If you don't see why you should use a dependency manager at all, or have any question
concerning Apache Ivy in general, have a look at the <a href="faq.html">FAQ</a>
and at the [[mailing-lists]].</p>
-<h1>Integrated with Apache Ant</h1>
-<p>Of course, Aache Ivy is integrated with the most popular build management system
for Java projects. But the integration goes way beyond common Apache Ant integration. Indeed
Apache Ivy has been designed with Apache Ant integration and design principles in mind. If
you have Apache Ant skills, you already have Apache Ivy skills! The plugin mechanism in Apache
Ivy follows the same design as Apache Ant, you will find macrodef and files import in Apache
Ivy configuration, many things Apache Ant users are already familiar with.<br/>
-And since Apache Ivy is a sub project of Apache Ant, we even share the same development community!</p>
+<h1>Integrated with Apache Ant&#153;</h1>
+<p>Of course, Aache Ivy is integrated with the most popular build management system
for Java projects. But the integration goes way beyond common Apache Ant integration. Indeed
Apache Ivy has been designed with Apache Ant integration and design principles in mind. If
you have Apache Ant skills, you already have Apache Ivy skills! The plugin mechanism in Apache
Ivy follows the same design as Apache Ant, you will find macrodef and files import in Apache
Ivy configuration, many things Apache Ant users are already familiar with</p>
+<p>And since Apache Ivy is a subproject of Apache Ant, we even share the same development
community!</p>
 <h1>Simple to use</h1>
 <p>For simple cases, Apache Ivy is easy to use. Declare your dependencies, and that's
all. See the [[doc:tutorial/start quick start tutorial]] to check yourself, it should take
less than 5 minutes!</p>
-<p>Apache Ivy can therefore be used to bring the dependency management feature of maven
to Apache Ant build files, for those of you who already use Apache Ant and who do not want
to setup an Apache Maven project. But Apache Ivy does not stop there, it provides many more
great features!</p>
+<p>Apache Ivy can therefore be used to bring the dependency management feature of Apache
Maven&#153; to Apache Ant build files, for those of you who already use Apache Ant and
who do not want to setup an Apache Maven project. But Apache Ivy does not stop there, it provides
many more great features!</p>
 <h1>Clean dependency reports</h1>
 <p>Apache Ivy is able to produce mainly two kind of reports: HTML reports and graph
reports. HTML reports gives you a good understanding of what Apache Ivy did, and which dependencies
your project depends upon. The graph reports let you have a good overview of the transitive
dependencies (see below) and conflicts in your project.</p>
 <p>Here are some samples of what Apache Ivy generates for you:<br />

Modified: ant/ivy/site/links.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/links.html?rev=1036229&r1=1036228&r2=1036229&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/links.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/links.html Wed Nov 17 21:15:18 2010
@@ -88,8 +88,8 @@
 </ul>
 <h1>Others</h1>
 <ul>
-<li><a href="http://ant.apache.org/">ant</a></li>
-<p>Ant is the popular build tool with which ivy is integrated.</p>
+<li><a href="http://ant.apache.org/">Apache Ant&#153;</a></li>
+<p>Apache Ant is the popular build tool with which ivy is integrated.</p>
 <li><a href="http://ant-contrib.sourceforge.net/">AntContrib</a></li>
 <p>AntContrib is a project offering a set of useful tasks for ant.</p>
 <li><a href="http://www.javalobby.org/">Javalobby</a></li>

Modified: ant/ivy/site/m2comparison.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/m2comparison.html?rev=1036229&r1=1036228&r2=1036229&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/m2comparison.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/m2comparison.html Wed Nov 17 21:15:18 2010
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@
 </head>
 <body>
 	<textarea id="xooki-source">
-We are frequently asked how Apache Ivy&#153; compares to Apache Maven, so we have decided
togives some insight about our opinion on the subject.
+We are frequently asked how Apache Ivy&#153; compares to Apache Maven&#153;, so we
have decided togives some insight about our opinion on the subject.
 
 Obviously this comparison is biased (hey, you are on official Apache Ivy site :-)), but we'll
try to keep it as fair as possible. Do not hesitate to add comment if you feel something is
missing or false on this page. You can also have a look at <a href="http://docs.codehaus.org/display/MAVEN/Feature+Comparisons">Apache
Maven2 feature comparison page on codehaus</a>, which itself offers another point of
view.
 
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ There have been also several discussions
 But here is the points we think mainly differentiate Apache Ivy and Apache Maven.
 
 <h1>Comparing plants and apples</h1>
-First, the most important difference is that they aren't at all the same kind of tools. Apache
Maven is a software project management and comprehension tool, whereas Apache Ivy is only
a dependency management tool, highly integrated with Apache Ant, the popular build management
tool. So maybe a more interesting comparison would compare Apache Ant+Ivy vs Apache Maven.
But this goes beyond the scope of this page which concentrates on dependency management only.

+First, the most important difference is that they aren't at all the same kind of tools. Apache
Maven is a software project management and comprehension tool, whereas Apache Ivy is only
a dependency management tool, highly integrated with Apache Ant&#153;, the popular build
management tool. So maybe a more interesting comparison would compare Apache Ant+Ivy vs Apache
Maven. But this goes beyond the scope of this page which concentrates on dependency management
only. 
 
 <h1>Different concepts</h1>
 Apache Ivy heavily relies on a unique concept called configuration. In Apache Ivy, a module
configuration is a way to use or to see the module. For instance, you can have a test and
runtime configuration in your module. But you can also have a mysql and an oracle configuration.
Or an hibernate and a jdbc configuration. In each configuration you can declare what artifacts
(jar, war, ...) are required. And in each configuration, you can declare your dependencies
on other modules, and describe which configuration of the dependency you need. This is called
configuration mapping, and it is a very flexible way to answer to a lot of problems we face
very often in software development.

Modified: ant/ivy/site/toc.json
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/toc.json?rev=1036229&r1=1036228&r2=1036229&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/toc.json (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/toc.json Wed Nov 17 21:15:18 2010
@@ -47,7 +47,7 @@
               "children": [
                   {
                     "id":"m2comparison",
-                    "title":"Apache Ivy / Apache Maven Comparison",
+                    "title":"Apache Ivy&#153 / Apache Maven&#153 Comparison",
                     "children": [
 
                       ]
@@ -469,7 +469,7 @@
       },
       {
         "id":"ivyde",
-        "title":"IvyDE",
+        "title":"Apache IvyDE&#153",
         "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/ivyde/index.html",
         "children": [
 



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