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From maart...@apache.org
Subject svn commit: r1026148 - in /ant/ivy/site: CryptoNotice.html choose-distrib.html demo.html download.html faq.html features.html get-involved.html history.html index.html m2comparison.html mailing-lists.html search.html toc.json write-doc.html
Date Thu, 21 Oct 2010 21:36:04 GMT
Author: maartenc
Date: Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
New Revision: 1026148

URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc?rev=1026148&view=rev
Log:
- Changes made as requested by the new "Apache Project Branding" guidelines:
Ivy => Apache Ivy
Ant => Apache Ant
Maven => Apache Maven
- Some minor documentation improvements.

Modified:
    ant/ivy/site/CryptoNotice.html
    ant/ivy/site/choose-distrib.html
    ant/ivy/site/demo.html
    ant/ivy/site/download.html
    ant/ivy/site/faq.html
    ant/ivy/site/features.html
    ant/ivy/site/get-involved.html
    ant/ivy/site/history.html
    ant/ivy/site/index.html
    ant/ivy/site/m2comparison.html
    ant/ivy/site/mailing-lists.html
    ant/ivy/site/search.html
    ant/ivy/site/toc.json
    ant/ivy/site/write-doc.html

Modified: ant/ivy/site/CryptoNotice.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/CryptoNotice.html?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/CryptoNotice.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/CryptoNotice.html Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -48,12 +48,12 @@ code and source code.
 The following provides more details on the included cryptographic
 software:
 
-For the Ivy ssh resolver requires the JSch 
-http://www.jcraft.com/jsch/index.html library. 
+The ssh resolver requires the JSch library
+http://www.jcraft.com/jsch/index.html.
 The sftp and https resolvers requires the Java Cryptography extensions
 http://java.sun.com/javase/technologies/security/.
 The PGP signature generator requires the BouncyCastle Java cryptography APIs
-http://www.bouncycastle.org/java.html
+http://www.bouncycastle.org/java.html.
 </code></textarea>
 <script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>
 </body>

Modified: ant/ivy/site/choose-distrib.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/choose-distrib.html?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/choose-distrib.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/choose-distrib.html Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -25,19 +25,18 @@
 </head>
 <body>
 	<textarea id="xooki-source">
-Each distribution of ivy contains examples and documentation. The documentation can also be browsed online, we have an history of all versions since 2.0.0-alpha2.
+Each distribution of Apache Ivy contains examples and documentation. The documentation can also be browsed online, we have an history of all versions since 2.0.0-alpha2.
 
-With each version of ivy, you can find:
+With each version of Apache Ivy, you can find:
 <h2>binary distribution</h2>
-Containing ivy jars, documentation and examples + a build.xml to download dependencies from maven2 repository.
-This is the recommended version to use Ivy, you will get ivy jar and be able to make your first use of Ivy to download the dependencies you need. All Ivy dependencies are only optional, so you can even use it without downloading any dependency. It requires at least a jre 1.4+ to run, and it is recommended to use it with Ant (1.5.1+, 1.6.2+ recommended).
+Containing jars, documentation and examples + a build.xml to download dependencies from a maven2 repository.
+This is the recommended version to use Apache Ivy, you will get the jar and be able to make your first use of Apache Ivy to download the dependencies you need. All dependencies are optional, so you can use Apache Ivy without downloading any dependency. It requires at least a jre 1.4+ to run, and it can be used with Ant 1.6.2 or later.
 <h2>binary distribution with dependencies</h2>
-Containing ivy jars, dependencies, documentation and examples.
-This version is well suited if you want to easily use Ivy with all its optional tasks reying on external dependencies, without having to download them later. It requires at least a jre 1.4+ to run, and it is recommended to use it with Ant (1.5.1+, 1.6.2+ recommended).
+Containing jars, dependencies, documentation and examples.
+This version is well suited if you want to easily use Apache Ivy with all its optional tasks relying on external dependencies, without having to download them later. It requires at least a jre 1.4+ to run, and it can be used with Ant 1.6.2 or later.
 <h2>sources</h2>
-Ready to be build with Ant 1.6.0 or greater. You will need to have an internet access during the build in order to get Ivy download its dependencies from the repository.
-This is the recommended version if you want to build Ivy yourself and see it in action at the same time.
-<i>Note:</i> version 1.6.0 of ant is required here because the build file use its namespace feature to import Ivy tasks.
+Ready to be build with Ant 1.6.2 or later. You will need to have an internet access during the build in order to get Apache Ivy download its dependencies from the repository.
+This is the recommended version if you want to build Apache Ivy yourself and see it in action at the same time.
 </textarea>
 <script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>
 </body>

Modified: ant/ivy/site/demo.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/demo.html?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/demo.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/demo.html Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@
 </head>
 <body>
 	<textarea id="xooki-source">
-The Ivy demo is not available yet. Come back later or contribute a new demo!</textarea>
+The Apache Ivy demo is not available yet. Come back later or contribute a new demo!</textarea>
 <script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>
 </body>
 </html>

Modified: ant/ivy/site/download.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/download.html?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/download.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/download.html Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -30,9 +30,9 @@
 
 Version 2.2.0 of Apache Ivy is available. Check the <a href="history/2.2.0/release-notes.html">release notes</a>.
 
-Use the links below to download a distribution of Ivy from one of our mirrors. It is good practice to <a href="[location]#VerifyReleases">verify the integrity</a> of the distribution files, especially if you are using one of our mirror sites. To do this you must use the signatures from our <a href="http://www.apache.org/dist/ant/ivy/">main distribution directory</a>.
+Use the links below to download a distribution of Apache Ivy from one of our mirrors. It is good practice to <a href="[location]#VerifyReleases">verify the integrity</a> of the distribution files, especially if you are using one of our mirror sites. To do this you must use the signatures from our <a href="http://www.apache.org/dist/ant/ivy/">main distribution directory</a>.
 
-Ivy is distributed as zip and tar.gz archives - the contents are the same. Please note that the tar.gz archives contain file names longer than 100 characters and have been created using GNU tar extensions. Thus they must be untarred with a GNU compatible version of tar.
+Apache Ivy is distributed as zip and tar.gz archives - the contents are the same. Please note that the tar.gz archives contain file names longer than 100 characters and have been created using GNU tar extensions. Thus they must be untarred with a GNU compatible version of tar.
 
 If you do not see the file you need in the links below, please see the <a href="http://www.apache.org/dist/ant/ivy/">master distribution directory</a> or, preferably, its <a href="[preferred]/ant/ivy/">mirror</a>.
 
@@ -73,14 +73,14 @@ What you can get here at the ASF is the 
 <code>
 svn co https://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/ant/ivy/core/trunk ivy
 </code>
-Then to build Ivy from source, assuming you have ant 1.6.2+ and a jdk 1.4+ installed, then you only need to run the following command:
+Then to build Apache Ivy from source, assuming you have ant 1.6.2+ and a jdk 1.4+ installed, then you only need to run the following command:
 <code>
 ant jar
 </code>
 Then you will find ivy.jar in <b>build/artifact</b>.
 
 <h2>Snapshot build</h2>
-The Apache Software Foundation hosts an installation of the Hudson CI-system where a continuous build of Ivy is available. Note that these are not official builds and they are not endorsed or even supported by the Ivy team. But if you have problems with testing the latest (successful) build, you are welcome to post that on the mailinglist. 
+The Apache Software Foundation hosts an installation of the Hudson CI-system where a continuous build of Ivy is available. Note that these are not official builds and they are not endorsed or even supported by the Apache Ivy team. But if you have problems with testing the latest (successful) build, you are welcome to post that on the mailinglist. 
 
 The project page of Ivy on this Hudson installation is: http://hudson.zones.apache.org/hudson/view/Ant/job/Ivy. Here you can find links to the latest version of the jars.
 

Modified: ant/ivy/site/faq.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/faq.html?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/faq.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/faq.html Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -26,44 +26,37 @@
 <body>
 	<textarea id="xooki-source">
 <h1>What and Why</h1>
-<h2><a name="what-is-ivy"></a>What is Ivy ?</h2>
-<p>Ivy is a powerful dependencies manager with transitive dependencies support and much more <a href="features.html">features</a>.</p>
-<p>With Ivy you define the dependencies of your module in an xml file, called an ivy file. Then you usually ask ivy to retrieve your dependencies to a local lib dir, and it does it for you by locating the artifacts of your dependencies in repositories, such as ibiblio.</p>
+<h2><a name="what-is-ivy"></a>What is Apache Ivy ?</h2>
+<p>Apache Ivy is a powerful dependencies manager with transitive dependencies support and much more <a href="features.html">features</a>.</p>
+<p>With Apache Ivy you define the dependencies of your module in an xml file, called an ivy-file. Then you usually ask Apache Ivy to retrieve your dependencies to a local lib dir, and it does it for you by locating the artifacts of your dependencies in repositories, such as a maven2 repository for instance.</p>
 <h2><a name="why-should-i-use-a-dependencies-manager"></a>Why should I use a dependencies manager ?</h2>
 <p>Without a dependencies manager, two solutions are often used to store the dependencies of a project: a project lib dir or direct access to a shared repository.<br />
 The major drawback of the project lib dir is that the same dependencies are stored in multiple location if you have several projects using the same dependencies. Moreover, we often see project where dependencies revisions are not documented, which can cause problems for maintenance.<br />
 With the shared repository the problem is often to maintain the list of dependencies of the project. This list is often lost within the build file, which does not help maintenance. Moreover, this solution often requires a download of the whole repository, unless home made dependencies management solution has been used.</p>
 <p>Finally, the major drawback of these solutions is that they do not use transitive dependencies. Transitive dependencies are the dependencies of your dependencies. Managing transitive dependencies  let you declare dependencies only on what you really need, and not what the module you use themselves need. This not only eases your dependencies declaration, but it also improves a lot the maintenability of your project, especially in multi-project environment. Imagine you develop a component used in several other projects. Then each time your component needs a new dependency, without transitive dependencies, you have to update all the projects using your component ! And this could really take a lot of time !</p>
-<h2><a name="why-should-i-use-ivy"></a>Why should I use Ivy ?</h2>
-<p>If you are convinced of using a dependencies manager, you may wonder why using Ivy and not another tool. We are not able to answer this question without being biased, but have a look at Ivy <a href="features.html">features</a> and the [[m2comparison product comparison]] we provide, and you will certainly see that Ivy is one of the best dependencies manager currently available ;-)</p>
-<h2><a name="how-does-ivy-differ-from-maven-2"></a>How does Ivy differ from Maven2 ?</h2>
+<h2><a name="why-should-i-use-ivy"></a>Why should I use Apache Ivy ?</h2>
+<p>If you are convinced of using a dependencies manager, you may wonder why using Apache Ivy and not another tool. We are not able to answer this question without being biased, but have a look at Apache Ivy <a href="features.html">features</a> and the [[m2comparison product comparison]] we provide, and you will certainly see that Apache Ivy is one of the best dependencies manager currently available ;-)</p>
+<h2><a name="how-does-ivy-differ-from-maven-2"></a>How does Apache Ivy differ from Apache Maven ?</h2>
 <p>The answer to this question is too long, so it deserves its own page <a href="m2comparison.html">here</a>.</p>
-<h1>Ivy in use</h1>
+<h1>Apache Ivy in use</h1>
 <h2><a name="i-dont-understand-whats-happening"></a>I don't understand what's happening...</h2>
-<p>The first thing to do when you don't understand what's going wrong is to try to change the message level. If you use ant, you can use the -debug or -verbose options to get more detailed messages and better understand what's happening.</p>
-<h2><a name="ivy-seems-to-fail-connecting"></a>Ivy seems to fail connecting to ibiblio...</h2>
-<p>First, check if the ibiblio site is ok with your favorite browser. If the site is ok, maybe it's a problem of proxy configuration. Set your ANT_OPTS environment variable<br />
-to configure your proxy if you have one.<br />
+<p>The first thing to do when you don't understand what's going wrong is to try to change the message level. If you use Apache Ant, you can use the -debug or -verbose options to get more detailed messages and better understand what's happening.</p>
+<h2><a name="ivy-seems-to-fail-connecting"></a>Apache Ivy seems to fail connecting to ibiblio...</h2>
+<p>First, check if the ibiblio site is ok with your favorite browser. If the site is ok, maybe it's a problem of proxy configuration. Set your ANT_OPTS environment variable to configure your proxy if you have one.<br />
 For instance:<br />
 <code>set ANT_OPTS=-Dhttp.proxyHost=myproxy -Dhttp.proxyPort=3128</code>
 Or for authenticated proxy:
 <code>set ANT_OPTS=-Dhttp.proxyHost=myproxyhost -Dhttp.proxyPort=8080 -Dhttp.proxyUserName=myproxyusername -Dhttp.proxyPassword=myproxypassword -Dhttps.proxyHost=myproxyhost -Dhttps.proxyPort=8080</code>
 </p>
-<p>If it still doesn't work, maybe it's your dependency file which is not ok. Check<br />
-if the module name you depend on is actually a name of directory under<br />
-<a href="http://www.ibiblio.org/maven/" title="www.ibiblio.org/maven/">www.ibiblio.org/maven/</a>. If this is the case, check if the jar with a name like<br />
-[module]-[revision].jar is present under the jars directory of this module on ibiblio.<br />
+<p>If it still doesn't work, maybe it's your dependency file which is not ok. Check if the module name you depend on is actually a name of directory under
+<a href="http://www.ibiblio.org/maven/" title="www.ibiblio.org/maven/">www.ibiblio.org/maven/</a>. If this is the case, check if the jar with a name like [module]-[revision].jar is present under the jars directory of this module on ibiblio.<br />
 For instance: <a href="http://www.ibiblio.org/maven/commons-httpclient/jars/commons-httpclient-2.0.jar" title="www.ibiblio.org/maven/commons-httpclient/jars/commons-httpclient-2.0.jar">www.ibiblio.org/maven/commons-httpclient/jars/commons-httpclient-2.0.jar</a></p>
-<p>If this is the case, check your ivy configuration to see if you actually use the ibiblio<br />
-or ivyrep resolver.</p>
-<p>Finally, you can check if the files were not downloaded but corrupted<br />
-(Ivy has no md5 checking for the moment) by checking your lib directory and opening<br />
-the jars if any with an unzip program.</p>
-<p>If you still have problems post on the [[mailing-lists]]<br />
-mentioning your OS, your version of ant, your version of ivy, your configuration file<br />
-and your ivy file.</p>
-<h2><a name="ivy-fails-to-get-an-artifact"></a>Ivy fails to get an artifact / ivy file on my http server. What's wrong?</h2>
-<p>The first thing to do is to ensure the setting is correct. Ivy should log the url it tried, copy this url and paste it in your favorite browser, and verify you get no error.</p>
+<p>If this is the case, check your configuration to see if you actually use the ibiblio resolver.</p>
+<p>Finally, you can check if the files were not downloaded but corrupted by checking your lib directory and opening the jars if any with an unzip program. Apache Ivy has sha1/md5 checking, but not all repositories contains such checksums.</p>
+<p>If you still have problems post your issue on the [[mailing-lists]] 
+mentioning your OS, your version of Apache Ant, your version of Apache Ivy, your configuration file and your ivy-file.</p>
+<h2><a name="ivy-fails-to-get-an-artifact"></a>Apache Ivy fails to get an artifact on my http server. What's wrong?</h2>
+<p>The first thing to do is to ensure the setting is correct. Apache Ivy should log the url it tried, copy this url and paste it in your favorite browser, and verify you get no error.</p>
 <p>If this is ok, check if you don't need any proxy setting nor authentication. For proxy setting, you can use for instance this:<br />
 <code>set ANT_OPTS=-Dhttp.proxyHost=myproxy -Dhttp.proxyPort=3128</code><br />
 Or for authenticated proxy:
@@ -75,44 +68,39 @@ For http authentication, fill in the app
 <p>No problem, you just have to set an ant property:</p>
 <code><property name="ivy.lib.dir" value="pathtomylibdir"/></code>
 <h2><a name="getting-rid-of-revision"></a>What if I do not want the revision of the files I retrieve to appear in the file name ?</h2>
-<p>A typical question for people using an IDE like eclipse and often changing<br />
-dependency revision: it's a bit boring to change your IDE project just to tell<br />
-him to use comp-build2596.jar instead of comp-build2595.jar, when you have<br />
-already changed your ivy file (and even if you haven't changed it, if you use<br />
-the continuous integration feature !). No problem, you have a total control on<br />
-the files retrieved using the pattern attribute in the retrieve task:</p>
+<p>A typical question for people using an IDE like eclipse and often changing dependency revision: it's a bit boring to change your IDE project just to tell
+him to use comp-build2596.jar instead of comp-build2595.jar, when you have
+already changed your ivy file (and even if you haven't changed it, if you use the continuous integration feature !). No problem, you have a total control on the files retrieved using the pattern attribute in the retrieve task:</p>
 <p>Here is the default pattern:</p>
 <code><ivy:retrieve pattern="${ivy.lib.dir}/[artifact]-[revision].[ext]"/></code>
 <p>And here is one which do not suffix file name with dependency revision:</p>
 <code><ivy:retrieve pattern="${ivy.lib.dir}/[artifact].[ext]"/></code>
 <p>And one which makes your lib directory have the same layout as the ibiblio repository:</p>
 <code><ivy:retrieve pattern="${ivy.lib.dir}/[module]/[type]s/[artifact]-[revision].[ext]"/></code>
-<p>Not too difficult, and really flexible, isn't it ? And check the retrieve task<br />
-reference documentation to learn more about it...</p>
+<p>Not too difficult, and really flexible, isn't it ? And check the retrieve task reference documentation to learn more about it...</p>
 <h2><a name="why-two-xml-files"></a>Why two xml files ?</h2>
-<p>Ivy uses two types of xml files: configuration files and ivy files.</p>
-<p>In fact, Ivy distinguishes two different steps to describe and get your<br />
-dependencies:<br />
+<p>Apache Ivy uses two types of xml files: configuration files and ivy files.</p>
+<p>In fact, Apache Ivy distinguishes two different steps to describe and get your dependencies:<br />
 You write ivy files to describe the dependencies of your module, independently of how you retrieve them.<br />
-Then you configure ivy to indicate where it can find your dependencies. Thus you can easily share your ivy files, even if you have internal dependencies which are not resolved the same way in your environment as in the target development environment. You just need to write two configuration files, one in your default development environment, and one in the target development environment with the <b>same ivy files</b>. </p>
+Then you configure Apache Ivy to indicate where it can find your dependencies. Thus you can easily share your ivy files, even if you have internal dependencies which are not resolved the same way in your environment as in the target development environment. You just need to write two configuration files, one in your default development environment, and one in the target development environment with the <b>same ivy files</b>. </p>
 <h2><a name="how-do-i-separate-dependencies"></a>How do I separate the dependencies I need at xxx time and the one I need at yyy time ?</h2>
-<p>Ivy uses a concept called <i>configurations</i> to handle this, and many more. As explained in the [[doc:terminology terminology page]], a <i>configuration</i> of your module can be thought as a way to use your module (<i>note: this has nothing to do with the configuration of ivy itself, through the use of configuration file</i>). You can describe what dependencies are needed in each configuration. </p>
-<p>Moreover, because the dependencies are modules too, they can also have configurations. What is extremely powerful with ivy is that you can define configurations mapping, i.e. which conf of the dependency is needed in which conf of your module. Thus what is needed at 'runtime' of a dependency can be needed for 'test' of your module.</p>
-<p>Finally, the configurations are unlimited, defined in each module, and can extend each other. This contributes a lot to ivy flexibility.</p>
+<p>Apache Ivy uses a concept called <i>configurations</i> to handle this, and many more. As explained in the [[doc:terminology terminology page]], a <i>configuration</i> of your module can be thought as a way to use your module (<i>note: this has nothing to do with the configuration of Apache Ivy itself, through the use of configuration file</i>). You can describe what dependencies are needed in each configuration. </p>
+<p>Moreover, because the dependencies are modules too, they can also have configurations. What is extremely powerful with Apache Ivy is that you can define configurations mapping, i.e. which conf of the dependency is needed in which conf of your module. Thus what is needed at 'runtime' of a dependency can be needed for 'test' of your module.</p>
+<p>Finally, the configurations are unlimited, defined in each module, and can extend each other. This contributes a lot to the flexibility of Apache Ivy.</p>
 <h2><a name="no-artifact"></a>Can I write an ivy file for a module with no artifact at all ?</h2>
 <p>Yes, this is what is called a 'virtual' module.</p>
 <p>Having a module which has no publication and only dependencies can be useful in many cases. </p>
 <p>In particular, you can in this way define a set of dependencies used in several projects. Once defined, you can simply add a dependency on this virtual module to get all its dependencies, thanks to transitive dependencies management.</p>
 <p>It can also be useful if you want to define a flexible framework. In your framework, you will certainly have several modules, each having its own dependencies. But for the users of your framework, it can be interesting to provide a virtual module, representing the framework as a whole, and using configurations to let the user choose what he really wants to use in your framework, in a very flexible and effective way.</p>
-<p>But the problem is that ivy considers by default that a module publishes one artifact, with the same name as the module itself. So the way to define a virtual module is to add to its ivy file a publications section with no publication inside:</p>
+<p>But the problem is that Apache Ivy considers by default that a module publishes one artifact, with the same name as the module itself. So the way to define a virtual module is to add to its ivy file a publications section with no publication inside:</p>
 <code><publications/></code>
 <h2><a name="ibiblio-module-missing"></a>I do not manage to get xxx module on ibiblio. What's wrong ?</h2>
 <p>The problem can come from several places... usually it comes from the fact that some modules on ibiblio do not respect a clean structure.</p>
-<p>For instance, opensymphony projects are all in an opensymphony directory, which does not respect the [module]/[artifact]-[revision].[ext] pattern. In this case the only way to go with this is to configure another resolver with the appropriate pattern, and configure ivy to use this resolver for opensymphony only.</p>
-<p>Another similar problem is to have several modules in one directory, such xerces and xmlapis in the xerces directory. The problem is that if you consider the two as one module, you will be tempted to declare a dependency on two revisions of this module. This is not the right approach, because this does not match ivy definition of a module. A better approach is similar to the preceding one with a special configuration for this only.</p>
+<p>For instance, opensymphony projects are all in an opensymphony directory, which does not respect the [module]/[artifact]-[revision].[ext] pattern. In this case the only way to go with this is to configure another resolver with the appropriate pattern, and configure Apache Ivy to use this resolver for opensymphony only.</p>
+<p>Another similar problem is to have several modules in one directory, such xerces and xmlapis in the xerces directory. The problem is that if you consider the two as one module, you will be tempted to declare a dependency on two revisions of this module. This is not the right approach, because this does not match the Apache Ivy definition of a module. A better approach is similar to the preceding one with a special configuration for this only.</p>
 <p>Another solution is to setup a local repository for those modules that are not cleanly deployed on ibiblio. Using this local repository first and the ibiblio repository after is a good way to turn around the problems of ibiblio and still benefit from the huge number of artifacts that can be found.</p>
 <h2><a name="module-update"></a>When I update an ivy file in my repository ivy do not take the change into account. Is this normal ?</h2>
-<p>This the default behaviour of ivy, which relies on the revision and on its cache to avoid too many downloads. However, this can be changed on each resolver using the <em>checkmodified</em> attribute, or globally by setting <em>ivy.resolver.default.check.modified</em> variable to true.</p>
+<p>This the default behaviour of Apache Ivy, which relies on the revision and on its cache to avoid too many downloads. However, this can be changed on each resolver using the <em>checkmodified</em> attribute, or globally by setting <em>ivy.resolver.default.check.modified</em> variable to true.</p>
 <h1>Misc</h1>
 <h2><a name="release-notes"></a>Where are the release notes ?</h2>
 <p>Release notes can be found in the [[doc/index documentation]].</p>

Modified: ant/ivy/site/features.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/features.html?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/features.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/features.html Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -25,58 +25,58 @@
 </head>
 <body>
 	<textarea id="xooki-source">
-<p>Ivy is a very powerful dependency manager oriented toward Java dependency management, even though it could be used to manage dependencies of any kind.</p>
-<p>If you don't see why you should use a dependency manager at all, or have any question concerning Ivy in general, have a look at the <a href="faq.html">FAQ</a> and at the [[mailing-lists]].</p>
-<h1>Integrated with Ant</h1>
-<p>Of course, Ivy is integrated with the most popular build management system for Java projects. But the integration goes way beyond common Ant integration. Indeed Ivy has been designed with Ant integration and design principles in mind. If you have Ant skills, you already have Ivy skills! The plugin mechanism in Ivy follows the same design as Ant, you will find macrodef and files import in Ivy configuration, many things Ant users are already familiar with.<br/>
-And as Ivy is a sub project of Ant, we even share the same development community!</p>
+<p>Apache Ivy is a very powerful dependency manager oriented toward Java dependency management, even though it could be used to manage dependencies of any kind.</p>
+<p>If you don't see why you should use a dependency manager at all, or have any question concerning Apache Ivy in general, have a look at the <a href="faq.html">FAQ</a> and at the [[mailing-lists]].</p>
+<h1>Integrated with Apache Ant</h1>
+<p>Of course, Aache Ivy is integrated with the most popular build management system for Java projects. But the integration goes way beyond common Apache Ant integration. Indeed Apache Ivy has been designed with Apache Ant integration and design principles in mind. If you have Apache Ant skills, you already have Apache Ivy skills! The plugin mechanism in Apache Ivy follows the same design as Apache Ant, you will find macrodef and files import in Apache Ivy configuration, many things Apache Ant users are already familiar with.<br/>
+And since Apache Ivy is a sub project of Apache Ant, we even share the same development community!</p>
 <h1>Simple to use</h1>
-<p>For simple cases, Ivy is easy to use. Declare your dependencies, and that's all. See the [[doc:tutorial/start quick start tutorial]] to check yourself, it should take less than 5 minutes!</p>
-<p>Ivy can therefore be used to bring the dependency management feature of maven to Ant build files, for those of you who already use Ant and who do not want to setup a maven project. But Ivy does not stop there, it provides many more great features!</p>
+<p>For simple cases, Apache Ivy is easy to use. Declare your dependencies, and that's all. See the [[doc:tutorial/start quick start tutorial]] to check yourself, it should take less than 5 minutes!</p>
+<p>Apache Ivy can therefore be used to bring the dependency management feature of maven to Apache Ant build files, for those of you who already use Apache Ant and who do not want to setup an Apache Maven project. But Apache Ivy does not stop there, it provides many more great features!</p>
 <h1>Clean dependency reports</h1>
-<p>Ivy is able to produce mainly two kind of reports: HTML reports and graph reports. HTML reports gives you a good understanding of what Ivy did, and which dependencies your project depends upon. The graph reports let you have a good overview of the transitive dependencies (see below) and conflicts in your project.</p>
-<p>Here are some samples of what Ivy generates for you:<br />
+<p>Apache Ivy is able to produce mainly two kind of reports: HTML reports and graph reports. HTML reports gives you a good understanding of what Apache Ivy did, and which dependencies your project depends upon. The graph reports let you have a good overview of the transitive dependencies (see below) and conflicts in your project.</p>
+<p>Here are some samples of what Apache Ivy generates for you:<br />
 <center><br />
 <a href="history/latest-milestone/samples/ivy-sample-xslt.xml"><img src="images/ivyfile-small.png" title="browsable ivy file through simple xslt"/></a> <a href="images/hibgraph.png" alt="ivyfile"><img src="images/hibgraph-small.png" title="full dependency graph"/></a> <a href="history/latest-milestone/samples/jayasoft-ivyrep-example-default.html" alt="graph"><img src="images/report-small.png" title="detailed dependency report" alt="report"/></a><br />
 </center></p>
 <h1>Non intrusive</h1>
-<p>Ivy most common use is to resolve dependencies and copy them in the lib dir of your project. Once copied, your build does not depend on Ivy any more. Thus you can easily migrate existing builds using the lib dir pattern to store dependencies. Moreover, you can easily deliver your project with its dependencies so that the build file does not depend on Ivy.</p>
+<p>Apache Ivy most common use is to resolve dependencies and copy them in the lib dir of your project. Once copied, your build does not depend on Apache Ivy any more. Thus you can easily migrate existing builds using the lib dir pattern to store dependencies. Moreover, you can easily deliver your project with its dependencies so that the build file does not depend on Apache Ivy.</p>
 <h1>Extremely flexible</h1>
-<p>With Ivy, you usually do not have to adapt your project to Ivy structure, Ivy will conform to your environment.</p>
-<p>Even though Ivy comes with a lots of default values to work out of the box, you can change many things in Ivy. Of course, the dependencies repositories possibilities covers a lot of uses (file system, URL based, repository chaining, ...). But that's not all. You can change the way Ivy finds latest versions of your dependencies, you can change of conflict manager, you can choose if you want Ivy to copy dependencies in your project libs or use them directly from Ivy cache, ...</p>
+<p>With Apache Ivy, you usually do not have to adapt your project to Apache Ivy structure, Apache Ivy will conform to your environment.</p>
+<p>Even though Apache Ivy comes with a lots of default values to work out of the box, you can change many of them. Of course, the standard resolvers covers a lot of uses (file system, URL based, repository chaining, ...). But that's not all. You can change the way Apache Ivy finds latest versions of your dependencies, you can change the conflict manager, you can choose if you want Apache Ivy to copy dependencies in your project libs or use them directly from the cache, ...</p>
 <h1>Easily extensible</h1>
-<p>When Ivy does not do what you want out of the box, you can often extend it to solve your problem. For instance, you can plug your own repository. But you can also define your own latest strategy and your own conflict manager. See [[doc:extend how to extend Ivy]] in the reference doc. </p>
+<p>When Apache Ivy does not do what you want out of the box, you can often extend it to solve your problem. For instance, you can plug your own repository. But you can also define your own latest strategy and your own conflict manager. See [[doc:extend how to extend Ivy]] in the reference doc. </p>
 <p>Moreover you can even define very easily your own metadata on your modules, with [[doc:concept extra attributes]].</p>
 <h1>High performances</h1>
-<p>In Ivy, performances have been taken in consideration from the beginning. It uses a cache to avoid downloading twice a dependency, its strong conflict management system has been thought to avoid downloading a dependency if not necessary, all settings and Ivy files parsing are done using SAX for maximum performance, and so on...</p>
+<p>In Apache Ivy, performance have been taken in consideration from the beginning. It uses a cache to avoid downloading twice a dependency, its strong conflict management system has been thought to avoid downloading a dependency if not necessary, all settings and ivy files parsing are done using SAX for maximum performance, and so on...</p>
 <h1>Transitive dependencies</h1>
 <p>Imagine you have a component that you often reuse in your software development. Imagine that this component has dependencies as well. Then without a good dependency management tool, each time you use this component in your software you have to declare it as a dependency, but also all its dependencies.</p>
-<p>With Ivy it's different: you simply write a dependency file once for the component, declaring its own dependencies, then anytime you want to use this component you simply have to declare a dependency on it.</p>
-<p>And this is even more powerful if the component your software depends on changes of dependencies during its own development. Then, without Ivy, you have to maintain all your components dependencies declaration each time the dependencies of this component change. With Ivy, you update the Ivy file of the component and that's it !</p>
+<p>With Apache Ivy it's different: you simply write a dependency file once for the component, declaring its own dependencies, then anytime you want to use this component you simply have to declare a dependency on it.</p>
+<p>And this is even more powerful if the component your software depends on changes of dependencies during its own development. Then, without Apache Ivy, you have to maintain all your components dependencies declaration each time the dependencies of this component change. With Apache Ivy, you update the ivy file of the component and that's it!</p>
 <h1>Strong conflict management</h1>
-<p>The problem with transitive dependencies is that it's sometimes difficult to know exactly which version of a dependency you get, because several modules are depending on it in different versions. Ivy provides a strong and flexible conflict management engine, which let you easily choose which version should be evicted or kept if its default behavior does not fit your needs. </p>
+<p>The problem with transitive dependencies is that it's sometimes difficult to know exactly which version of a dependency you get, because several modules are depending on it in different versions. Apache Ivy provides a strong and flexible conflict management engine, which let you easily choose which version should be evicted or kept if its default behavior does not fit your needs. </p>
 <p>It is also fully integrated with transitive dependencies management, which means that conflicts are solved for each dependency before being solved for your whole module. This  ensures that problematic conflicts will only need to solved in the dependency they are encountered.</p>
 <h1>Out of the box maven repository support</h1>
-<p>The public maven repository has many advantages: a lot of modules available, easy search with mvnrepository.com, ... With Ivy, you benefit from this repository out of the box thanks to maven 2 metadata compatibility. </p>
+<p>The public maven repository has many advantages: a lot of modules available, easy search with mvnrepository.com, ... With Apache Ivy, you benefit from this repository out of the box thanks to maven2 metadata compatibility. </p>
 <h1>Continuous Integration Ready</h1>
 <p>Are you working in a continuous integration environment? No? You should ;-)</p>
-<p>If you are working in a continuous integration environment, and if you have many projects that depend one on each other, then you are maybe experiencing the dependency management nightmare... Fortunately, Ivy is there to help !</p>
-<p>With Ivy you can declare that a component depends on the latest version of another component. Knowing that, Ivy will search for the latest version of the dependency whenever you ask it to do so. This latest version is computed by Ivy  either by checking the date of the dependency versions or by comparing versions as text (either lexicographically or with an algorithm close to the one used in php version_compare function).</p>
+<p>If you are working in a continuous integration environment, and if you have many projects that depend one on each other, then you are maybe experiencing the dependency management nightmare... Fortunately, Apache Ivy is there to help !</p>
+<p>With Apache Ivy you can declare that a component depends on the latest version of another component. Knowing that, Apache Ivy will search for the latest version of the dependency whenever you ask it to do so. This latest version is computed either by checking the date of the dependency versions or by comparing versions as text (either lexicographically or with an algorithm close to the one used in php version_compare function).</p>
 <h1>Publication handling</h1>
-<p>Ivy handles for you the publication of your projects to your repository, as defined in Ivy. This simplifies a lot the management of multi-project environment.</p>
+<p>Apache Ivy handles for you the publication of your projects to your repository. This simplifies a lot the management of multi-project environment.</p>
 <h1>Pluggable module descriptor parsers</h1>
-<p>Ivy is able to use Ivy files as module descriptors, but also maven2 POMs, or even your own module descriptors! This can help you move softly from an existing repository of modules to an Ivy managed one.</p>
+<p>Apache Ivy is able to use ivy-files as module descriptors, but also maven2 POMs, or even your own module descriptors! This can help you move softly from an existing repository of modules to an Ivy managed one.</p>
 <h1>Unique enterprise features</h1>
-<p>Ivy is the only dependency management tool to support powerful features such as repository namespace and building through the install task. A [[doc:tutorial/build-repository tutorial]] is dedicated to this feature, and show you how you can build your own repository importing data from public one, and converting heterogeneous repositories into a stable and homogeneous one.</p>
+<p>Apache Ivy is the only dependency management tool to support powerful features such as repository namespace and building through the install task. A [[doc:tutorial/build-repository tutorial]] is dedicated to this feature, and show you how you can build your own repository importing data from public one, and converting heterogeneous repositories into a stable and homogeneous one.</p>
 <h1>Heavily tested</h1>
-<p>Ivy benefits from a lot of unit tests checked at each code modification. It is also under heavy testing by the community itself, and we pay a lot of attention to bug fixing and code stability.</p>
+<p>Apache Ivy benefits from a lot of unit tests checked at each code modification. It is also under heavy testing by the community itself, and we pay a lot of attention to bug fixing and code stability.</p>
 <h1>Free and open source</h1>
-<p>Ivy is an Apache project, which means that it's fully open sourced, with a business friendly Apache license.</p>
+<p>Apache Ivy is an Apache project, which means that it's fully open sourced, with a business friendly Apache license.</p>
 <p>Being open source, you can even modify it for your own needs, and let the community benefit from your enhancements if you like.</p>
 <h1>Extensively documented</h1>
-<p>With Ivy, not only the tool is free and open source, but you also have access to a very detailed documentation including tutorials and reference documentation, all for free!</p>
+<p>With Apache Ivy, not only the tool is free and open source, but you also have access to a very detailed documentation including tutorials and reference documentation, all for free!</p>
 <h1>Self contained</h1>
-<p>The core Ivy engine which allows to perform most of Ivy features is provided as a single jar with no dependency at all, except on JRE 1.4 or greater. This means that you can very easily use Ivy to bootstrap your build system, or embedded in your own tool. Ant support itself is provided only as a thin wrapper over Ivy engine so that you can do everything in embedded or standalone mode</p></textarea>
+<p>The core engine which allows to perform most of Apache Ivy features is provided as a single jar with no dependency at all, except on JRE 1.4 or greater. This means that you can very easily use Apache Ivy to bootstrap your build system, or embedded in your own tool. Apache Ant support itself is provided only as a thin wrapper over the Apache Ivy engine so that you can do everything in embedded or standalone mode.</p></textarea>
 <script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>
 </body>
 </html>

Modified: ant/ivy/site/get-involved.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/get-involved.html?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/get-involved.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/get-involved.html Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -25,22 +25,22 @@
 </head>
 <body>
 	<textarea id="xooki-source">
-As an Apache project, Ivy is very open to external contributions.
+As an Apache project, Apache Ivy is very open to external contributions.
 
-There are many ways to contribute to Ivy.
+There are many ways to contribute to Apache Ivy.
 
 First, [[download]] and use it, subscribe to the [[mailing-lists]], and answer other user questions. You can also browse [[issues jira issues]], vote for the ones you are most interested in, and add your comments and feedback. You can also very easily contribute to the [[wiki]].
 
-When you browse the documentation, whenever you see something that could be improved, feel free to edit it and provide a documentation patch. It's very easy if you browse the documentation offline (in the doc directory if you check out Ivy from svn), you will see a small toolbar at the upper right of the page, which allows you to edit the page. Then all you have to do is attach your modification as a patch to a new issue in JIRA.
+When you browse the documentation, whenever you see something that could be improved, feel free to edit it and provide a documentation patch. It's very easy if you browse the documentation offline (in the doc directory if you check out Apache Ivy from svn), you will see a small toolbar at the upper right of the page, which allows you to edit the page. Then all you have to do is attach your modification as a patch to a new issue in JIRA.
 <i>If you are interested in contributing documentation, read [[write-doc this page]].</i>
 
 You can also provide brand new documentation pages, tutorials, demos, or even links to a tutorial on your own blog. 
 
-Another useful way to contribute is to spread the word: if you like Ivy, say it! On your blog, on other blog comments, on popular java related sites, wherever. The more popular Ivy becomes, the more it will get external contributions, and the better it will be, for the benefit of the whole community.
+Another useful way to contribute is to spread the word: if you like Apache Ivy, say it! On your blog, on other blog comments, on popular java related sites, wherever. The more popular Apache Ivy becomes, the more it will get external contributions, and the better it will be, for the benefit of the whole community.
 
-When you get more confident with Ivy, you can check it out from svn, and begin to see if there are issues you could fix or implement, and provide patches to allow the whole community to benefit from your work.
+When you get more confident with Apache Ivy, you can check it out from svn, and begin to see if there are issues you could fix or implement, and provide patches to allow the whole community to benefit from your work.
 
-When you provide a patch, to increase the chance to get integrated, do not forget to provide a junit test, and a patch to the documentation if it changes anything in Ivy's behaviour.
+When you provide a patch, to increase the chance to get integrated, do not forget to provide a junit test, and a patch to the documentation if it changes anything in Apache Ivy's behaviour.
 
 And if you provide patches often, or answer many of the mailing list questions, you may get the chance to become a commiter, with write access to the svn repository!</textarea>
 <script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>

Modified: ant/ivy/site/history.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/history.html?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/history.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/history.html Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@
 </head>
 <body>
 	<textarea id="xooki-source">
-You can find here the whole history of Ivy versions.
+You can find here the whole history of Apache Ivy versions.
 
 The history is decomposed in streams, corresponding to major versions.
 

Modified: ant/ivy/site/index.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/index.html?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/index.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/index.html Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@
 <table border="0" class="home">
 <tr><td colspan="4"><img src="images/ivy-lierre.png"/></td></tr>
 <tr style="font-size:xx-large;"><td colspan="4"><span style="font-size:xx-large;">The agile dependency manager</span></td></tr>
-<tr><td colspan="4" style="font-size:large; padding: 1cm 0 0.7cm 0;">Ivy is a popular dependency manager focusing on flexibility and simplicity.<br/>
+<tr><td colspan="4" style="font-size:large; padding: 1cm 0 0.7cm 0;">Apache Ivy is a popular dependency manager focusing on flexibility and simplicity.<br/>
 Find out more about its unique <a href="features.html">enterprise features</a>, what <a href="testimonials.html">people say about it</a>,<br/>
 and [[doc:index how it can improve your build system!]]</td></tr>
 <tr class="homeitems"><td><a href="download.html"><img src="images/ivy-dl-2.2.0.png"/></a></td><td>[[doc:index <img src="images/ivy-book.png"/>]]</td><td><a href="demo.html"><img src="images/ivy-demo.png"/></a></td><td><a href="mailing-lists.html"><img src="images/ivy-forum.png"/></a></td></tr>

Modified: ant/ivy/site/m2comparison.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/m2comparison.html?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/m2comparison.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/m2comparison.html Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -25,27 +25,27 @@
 </head>
 <body>
 	<textarea id="xooki-source">
-We are frequently asked how ivy compares to maven2, so we have decided togives some insight about our opinion on the subject.
+We are frequently asked how Apache Ivy compares to Apache Maven, so we have decided togives some insight about our opinion on the subject.
 
-Obviously this comparison is biased (hey, you are on official Ivy site :-)), but we'll try to keep it as fair as possible. Do not hesitate to add comment if you feel something is missing or false on this page. You can also have a look at <a href="http://docs.codehaus.org/display/MAVEN/Feature+Comparisons">Maven2 feature comparison page on codehaus</a>, which itself offers another point of view.
+Obviously this comparison is biased (hey, you are on official Apache Ivy site :-)), but we'll try to keep it as fair as possible. Do not hesitate to add comment if you feel something is missing or false on this page. You can also have a look at <a href="http://docs.codehaus.org/display/MAVEN/Feature+Comparisons">Apache Maven2 feature comparison page on codehaus</a>, which itself offers another point of view.
 
 There have been also several discussions on the subject, among which the one triggered by <a href="http://xhab.blogspot.com/2006/09/interesting-discussions-about-maven-vs.html">spring contemplating about switching to maven</a> is may be the more interesting.
 
-But here is the points we think mainly differentiate maven2 and Ivy.
+But here is the points we think mainly differentiate Apache Ivy and Apache Maven.
 
 <h1>Comparing plants and apples</h1>
-First, the most important difference between maven2 and ivy is that they aren't at all the same kind of tools. Maven2 is a software project management and comprehension tool, whereas Ivy is only a dependency management tool, highly integrated with Ant, the popular build management tool. So maybe a more interesting comparison would compare Ant+Ivy vs Maven 2. But this goes beyond the scope of this page which concentrates on dependency management only. 
+First, the most important difference is that they aren't at all the same kind of tools. Apache Maven is a software project management and comprehension tool, whereas Apache Ivy is only a dependency management tool, highly integrated with Apache Ant, the popular build management tool. So maybe a more interesting comparison would compare Apache Ant+Ivy vs Apache Maven. But this goes beyond the scope of this page which concentrates on dependency management only. 
 
 <h1>Different concepts</h1>
-Ivy heavily relies on a unique concept called configuration. In ivy, a module configuration is a way to use or to see the module. For instance, you can have a test and runtime configuration in your module. But you can also have a mysql and an oracle configuration. Or an hibernate and a jdbc configuration. In each configuration you can declare what artifacts (jar, war, ...) are required. And in each configuration, you can declare your dependencies on other modules, and describe which configuration of the dependency you need. This is called configuration mapping, and it is a very flexible way to answer to a lot of problems we face very often in software development.
+Apache Ivy heavily relies on a unique concept called configuration. In Apache Ivy, a module configuration is a way to use or to see the module. For instance, you can have a test and runtime configuration in your module. But you can also have a mysql and an oracle configuration. Or an hibernate and a jdbc configuration. In each configuration you can declare what artifacts (jar, war, ...) are required. And in each configuration, you can declare your dependencies on other modules, and describe which configuration of the dependency you need. This is called configuration mapping, and it is a very flexible way to answer to a lot of problems we face very often in software development.
 
-Maven2 on its side has something called the scope. You can declare a dependency as being part of the test scope, or the buildtime scope. Then depending on this scope you will get the dependency artifact (only one artifact per module in maven2) with its dependencies depending on their scope. Scopes are predefined in maven2 and you can't change that. No way to create an oracle scope. No way to indicate you need what has been declared to be needed in the runtime scope of your dependency in your compile one. Everything here is written in the marble.
+Apache Maven on its side has something called the scope. You can declare a dependency as being part of the test scope, or the buildtime scope. Then depending on this scope you will get the dependency artifact (only one artifact per module) with its dependencies depending on their scope. Scopes are predefined and you can't change that. No way to create an oracle scope. No way to indicate you need what has been declared to be needed in the runtime scope of your dependency in your compile one. Everything here is written in the marble.
 
 And this leads to some kind of troubles... as Matt Raible stated in his <a href="http://raibledesigns.com/page/rd?anchor=maven_2_s_transitive_dependencies">blog</a> talking about maven2 dependencies:
 <blockquote>
 There are a *lot* of unnecessary dependencies downloaded for many libraries. For example, Hibernate downloads a bunch of JBoss JARs and the Display Tag downloads all the various web framework JARs. I found myself excluding almost as many dependencies as I added.
 </blockquote>
-The problem is that hibernate can be used with several cache implementations, several connection pool implementation, ... And this can't be managed with scopes, wheres Ivy configurations offers an elegant solution to this kind of problem. For instance, in ivy, assuming hibernate as an ivy file like <a href="http://ivyrep.jayasoft.org/hibernate/hibernate/ivy-2.1.8.xml">this one</a>, then you can declare a dependency like that:
+The problem is that hibernate can be used with several cache implementations, several connection pool implementation, ... And this can't be managed with scopes, wheres Apache Ivy configurations offers an elegant solution to this kind of problem. For instance, assuming hibernate has an ivy file like <a href="http://ivyrep.jayasoft.org/hibernate/hibernate/ivy-2.1.8.xml">this one</a>, then you can declare a dependency like that:
 <code type="xml">
 <dependency org="hibernate" name="hibernate" rev="2.1.8" conf="default->proxool,oscache"/>
 </code>
@@ -56,23 +56,23 @@ to get hibernate with its proxool and os
 to get hibernate with dbcp and swarmcache.
 
 <h1>Documentation</h1>
-An important thing to be able to use a tool is its amount of documentation. With Ivy, even if they are written in broken english (would you have preferred well written french :-)), the reference documentation is extensive and covers all the features including many examples. We also provide some official tutorials which are maintained with the new versions of Ivy. And since we consider documentation so important, we also provide online versions of documentation per Ivy version since Ivy 2.0.0-alpha2.
+An important thing to be able to use a tool is its amount of documentation. With Apache Ivy, even if they are written in broken english (would you have preferred well written french :-)), the reference documentation is extensive and covers all the features including many examples. We also provide some official tutorials which are maintained with the new versions of Apache Ivy. And since we consider documentation so important, we also provide online versions of documentation since version 2.0.0-alpha2.
 
-With maven2, it's a bit difficult to clearly know what can be considered as dependency management documentation, but we didn't managed to find much: some small introductory guides, short entries in the pom reference guide, and not really much more. Even in the maven book you can get for free on <a href="http://www.mergere.com/">mergere website</a>, the insight about dependency management is still light in our point of view. 
+With Apache Maven, it's a bit difficult to clearly know what can be considered as dependency management documentation, but we didn't managed to find much: some small introductory guides, short entries in the pom reference guide, and not really much more. Even in the maven book you can get for free on <a href="http://www.mergere.com/">mergere website</a>, the insight about dependency management is still light in our point of view. 
 
 <h1>Conflict management</h1>
-Conflict management are an important part of dependency management, cause when dealing with transitive dependencies you often have to face conflicts. In this area, Ivy let you do whatever you want: use one conflict manager in one module, another one elsewhere, decide which revision you will get, ... You can even plug your own conflict manager if you need to.
+Conflict management are an important part of dependency management, cause when dealing with transitive dependencies you often have to face conflicts. In this area, Apache Ivy let you do whatever you want: use one conflict manager in one module, another one elsewhere, decide which revision you will get, ... You can even plug your own conflict manager if you need to.
 
-With maven2, conflict management is quite simple: the principle is to get the nearest definition. So if your module depends on foo 1.0, none of your dependencies will ever manage to get foo 1.1 without a change in your own dependency declaration. It may be ok in some cases, it may not in others...
+With Apache Maven, conflict management is quite simple: the principle is to get the nearest definition. So if your module depends on foo 1.0, none of your dependencies will ever manage to get foo 1.1 without a change in your own dependency declaration. It may be ok in some cases, it may not in others...
 
 <h1>Flexibility</h1>
-In Ivy many things can be [[doc:configuration configured]], and many others can be [[doc:extend plugged in]]: dependency resolvers, conflict manager, module descriptor parser, latest revision strategy, ... 
+In Apache Ivy many things can be [[doc:configuration configured]], and many others can be [[doc:extend plugged in]]: dependency resolvers, conflict manager, module descriptor parser, latest revision strategy, ... 
 
-Maven2 also offers repository pluggability, but not much more as far as we know. Moreover, repository configuration is much less flexible than with Ivy: no repository chaining, no way to split metadata and artifacts in multiple repositories, ...
+Apache Maven also offers repository pluggability, but not much more as far as we know. Moreover, repository configuration is much less flexible than with Apache Ivy: no repository chaining, no way to split metadata and artifacts in multiple repositories, ...
 
 <h1>Public Repositories</h1>
-Maven2 comes out of the box configured to use maven2 repository, which contains <strong>a lot</strong> of modules (both artifacts and module descriptors). The only problem some may face is that module descriptors are not always checked, so some are not really well written.
-Ivy being compatible with maven 2 metadata, the default public repository used is also the maven 2 repository, which is fine for a good out of the box experience. 
+Apache Maven comes out of the box configured to use maven2 repository, which contains <strong>a lot</strong> of modules (both artifacts and module descriptors). The only problem some may face is that module descriptors are not always checked, so some are not really well written.
+Apache Ivy is compatible with maven 2 metadata, the default public repository used is also the maven 2 repository, which is fine for a good out of the box experience. 
 
 However, we [[doc:bestpractices don't recommend]] to use such a public repository for an enterprise build system, and as such Ivy provides features and documentation to build your own enterprise repository based (or not) on data available in the public repository. </textarea>
 <script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>

Modified: ant/ivy/site/mailing-lists.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/mailing-lists.html?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/mailing-lists.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/mailing-lists.html Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ Before posting to mailing lists, make su
 
 <hr/>
 <h2>Users mailing list</h2>
-Used to discuss any issue encountered when using Ivy
+Used to discuss any issue encountered when using Apache Ivy
 <table cellpadding="10">
 <tr><td>
 <a href="mailto:ivy-user@ant.apache.org">ivy-user@ant.apache.org</a>
@@ -53,7 +53,7 @@ Used to discuss any issue encountered wh
 </table>
 <hr/>
 <h2>Dev mailing list</h2>
-Used to discuss Ant and Ivy development
+Used to discuss Apache Ant and Apache Ivy development
 <table cellpadding="10">
 <tr><td>
 <a href="mailto:dev@ant.apache.org">dev@ant.apache.org</a>
@@ -97,9 +97,9 @@ Read only mailing list where all Ant pro
 </td></tr>
 </table>
 <hr/>
-While Ivy was incubating, the mailing lists used to be at the <tt>incubator.apache.org</tt> domain name. You can access archives in most popular mail archive sites by searching for Ivy incubator.
+While Apache Ivy was incubating, the mailing lists used to be at the <tt>incubator.apache.org</tt> domain name. You can access archives in most popular mail archive sites by searching for Apache Ivy incubator.
 
-Before migrating to the Apache Software Foundation, discussions about Ivy were on the Jayasoft forum, for which a backup is still available here:
+Before migrating to the Apache Software Foundation, discussions about Apache Ivy were on the Jayasoft forum, for which a backup is still available here:
 http://www.jaya.free.fr/ivy/forum.html
 
 All of these are indexed in our google custom search available from any page on this site.</textarea>

Modified: ant/ivy/site/search.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/search.html?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/search.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/search.html Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@
 </head>
 <body>
 	<textarea id="xooki-source">
-    Use Google Custom Search Engine to search over Ivy related sites. More details <a href="http://www.google.com/coop/cse?cx=014292259695392975429%3A5y6qypnrni8">here</a>.
+    Use Google Custom Search Engine to search over Apache Ivy related sites. More details <a href="http://www.google.com/coop/cse?cx=014292259695392975429%3A5y6qypnrni8">here</a>.
         <!-- Google CSE Search Box Begins -->
   <form id="searchbox_014292259695392975429:5y6qypnrni8" action="search.html">
     <input type="hidden" name="cx" value="014292259695392975429:5y6qypnrni8" />

Modified: ant/ivy/site/toc.json
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/toc.json?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/toc.json (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/toc.json Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@
               "children": [
                   {
                     "id":"m2comparison",
-                    "title":"Ivy / Maven2 Comparison",
+                    "title":"Apache Ivy / Apache Maven Comparison",
                     "children": [
 
                       ]
@@ -84,7 +84,10 @@
         "children": [
             {
               "title":"Trunk",
-              "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/trunk/index.html"
+              "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/trunk/index.html",
+              "children": [
+
+                ]
             },
             {
               "id":"2.x",
@@ -97,11 +100,17 @@
                     "children": [
                         {
                           "title":"2.2.0",
-                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.2.0/index.html"
+                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.2.0/index.html",
+                          "children": [
+
+                            ]
                         },
                         {
                           "title":"2.2.0-rc1",
-                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.2.0-rc1/index.html"
+                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.2.0-rc1/index.html",
+                          "children": [
+
+                            ]
                         }
                       ]
                   },
@@ -111,15 +120,24 @@
                     "children": [
                         {
                           "title":"2.1.0",
-                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.1.0/index.html"
+                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.1.0/index.html",
+                          "children": [
+
+                            ]
                         },
                         {
                           "title":"2.1.0-rc2",
-                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.1.0-rc2/index.html"
+                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.1.0-rc2/index.html",
+                          "children": [
+
+                            ]
                         },
                         {
                           "title":"2.1.0-rc1",
-                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.1.0-rc1/index.html"
+                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.1.0-rc1/index.html",
+                          "children": [
+
+                            ]
                         }
                       ]
                   },
@@ -129,27 +147,45 @@
                     "children": [
                         {
                           "title":"2.0.0",
-                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.0.0/index.html"
+                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.0.0/index.html",
+                          "children": [
+
+                            ]
                         },
                         {
                           "title":"2.0.0-rc2",
-                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.0.0-rc2/index.html"
+                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.0.0-rc2/index.html",
+                          "children": [
+
+                            ]
                         },
                         {
                           "title":"2.0.0-rc1",
-                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.0.0-rc1/index.html"
+                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.0.0-rc1/index.html",
+                          "children": [
+
+                            ]
                         },
                         {
                           "title":"2.0.0-beta2",
-                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.0.0-beta2/index.html"
+                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.0.0-beta2/index.html",
+                          "children": [
+
+                            ]
                         },
                         {
                           "title":"2.0.0-beta1",
-                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.0.0-beta1/index.html"
+                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.0.0-beta1/index.html",
+                          "children": [
+
+                            ]
                         },
                         {
                           "title":"2.0.0-alpha2",
-                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.0.0-alpha2/index.html"
+                          "url":"http://ant.apache.org/ivy/history/2.0.0-alpha2/index.html",
+                          "children": [
+
+                            ]
                         },
                         {
                           "id":"history/2.0.0-alpha-1",
@@ -414,4 +450,4 @@
           ]
       }
     ]
-}
+}
\ No newline at end of file

Modified: ant/ivy/site/write-doc.html
URL: http://svn.apache.org/viewvc/ant/ivy/site/write-doc.html?rev=1026148&r1=1026147&r2=1026148&view=diff
==============================================================================
--- ant/ivy/site/write-doc.html (original)
+++ ant/ivy/site/write-doc.html Thu Oct 21 21:36:03 2010
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@
 </head>
 <body>
 	<textarea id="xooki-source">
-Writing documentation for Ivy is pretty simple.
+Writing documentation for Apache Ivy is pretty simple.
 
 The documentation engine used is called <a href="http://xooki.sourceforge.net">xooki</a>, and allows to edit pages while you browse them as soon as you browse them offline (and thus can actually save your modifications).
 
@@ -82,9 +82,9 @@ To add a root entry to the TOC, open the
       {
         "id":"mydir/myfilename",
         "title":"My title",
-        "children": &amp;amp;#x5B;
+        "children": &#x5B;
 
-          &amp;amp;#x5D;
+          &#x5D;
       },
 </code>
 And create an HTML file mydir/myfilename.html with:
@@ -114,8 +114,8 @@ And create an HTML file mydir/myfilename
 	<script type="text/javascript" src="xooki/xooki.js"></script>
 </head>
 <body>
-	&amp;amp;lt;textarea id="xooki-source"&amp;amp;gt;
-&amp;amp;lt;/textarea&amp;amp;gt;
+	&lt;textarea id="xooki-source"&gt;
+&lt;/textarea&gt;
 <script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>
 </body>
 </html>
@@ -172,12 +172,12 @@ To make an entry point to an external UR
 
 <h1><a name="issues"></a>Known issues</h1>
 
-There is a special xml tag used by Xooki to handle the inline edition of the content: textarea with id xooki-source. In the current page we had to include that special tag. So in the source of this page there would be two tags with the same id "xooki-source", which is forbidden. So we have to xml encode it in the source, with some &amp;amp;amp;lt; and &amp;amp;amp;gt;.
+There is a special xml tag used by Xooki to handle the inline edition of the content: textarea with id xooki-source. In the current page we had to include that special tag. So in the source of this page there would be two tags with the same id "xooki-source", which is forbidden. So we have to xml encode it in the source, with some &amp;lt; and &amp;gt;.
 
-There also an issue with some json code. Above there are some json code which has to be xml encoded unless Xooki got confused. So &amp;amp;#x5B; and &amp;amp;#x5D; have to be encoded into respectively  &amp;amp;amp;#x5B; and &amp;amp;amp;#x5D;.
+There also an issue with some json code. Above there are some json code which has to be xml encoded unless Xooki got confused. So &#x5B; and &#x5D; have to be encoded into respectively  &amp;#x5B; and &amp;#x5D;.
 
-And there are some xml encoding issues while inline editing. Generally you don't need to xml encode them, Xooki will handle it for you. But as discussed above, sometimes you are forced to use some. So as you may see the source of this page, xml entities are encoded 3 times. If you want to display an xml encoded &amp;amp;amp; then you will have to write &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;.
-<b>IMPORTANT NOTE</b>: if you edit a page with Xooki which has some xml entities, Xooki will eat them and the triple encoding will disappear. Before saving you have to be sure to re-encode the &amp;amp;amp; of the entities two times: in the page you will see &amp;amp;amp;#x5D; which has to be replaced by &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;#x5D;. The simpler though is to edit this kind of file via a text editor and not a browser.
+And there are some xml encoding issues while inline editing. Generally you don't need to xml encode them, Xooki will handle it for you. But as discussed above, sometimes you are forced to use some. So as you may see the source of this page, xml entities are encoded 3 times. If you want to display an xml encoded &amp; then you will have to write &amp;amp;amp;amp;.
+<b>IMPORTANT NOTE</b>: if you edit a page with Xooki which has some xml entities, Xooki will eat them and the triple encoding will disappear. Before saving you have to be sure to re-encode the &amp; of the entities two times: in the page you will see &amp;#x5D; which has to be replaced by &amp;amp;amp;#x5D;. The simpler though is to edit this kind of file via a text editor and not a browser.
 
 </textarea>
 <script type="text/javascript">xooki.postProcess();</script>



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