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From bugzi...@apache.org
Subject DO NOT REPLY [Bug 14617] - Windows environment information incorrect, or task is broken.
Date Wed, 05 Feb 2003 09:46:33 GMT
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http://nagoya.apache.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=14617

Windows environment information incorrect, or task is broken.

conor@cortexebusiness.com.au changed:

           What    |Removed                     |Added
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
             Status|REOPENED                    |RESOLVED
         Resolution|                            |FIXED
   Target Milestone|---                         |1.6



------- Additional Comments From conor@cortexebusiness.com.au  2003-02-05 09:46 -------
The essential point of this section is that under Windows systems, the
definition of user.home is variable - you need to make sure you know what your
combination of the OS/JVM is going to do. Your original assertion "Sun's
implementation always sets the user.home to {WINDOWS}\Documents and
Settings\{username}" is clearly not true as you yourself have indicated. On
Unix, there is far less unpredictably - user.home will resolve to your home
directory.

As for your flaws - I don't agree.
1. The document does not mention a specific version of Windows/JVM combination.
Neither Windows98 nor Windows ME have been end-of-lifed.
2. The use of C:\Windows to store user properties on Windows 98/ME systems is
nto something I would encourage - I try to keep out of the operating system's areas.
3. Finally the statement is valid - it is a single data point showing the
variablility of user.home under windows. It is not and does not claim to be an
exhaustive reference of OS/JVM combinations.

Nevertheless, to bring this to conclusion, I have reworded the section in
question as follows:

Where the "user.home" property resolves to in the file system depends on the
operating system version and the JVM implementation. On Unix based systems, this
will map to the user's home directory. On modern Windows variants, this will
most likely resolve to the user's directory in the "Documents and Settings"
folder. Older windows variants such as Windows 98/ME are less predictable, as
are other operating system/JVM combinations.

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