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From bode...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: jakarta-ant/docs/manual running.html install.html toc.html
Date Tue, 10 Apr 2001 07:06:38 GMT
bodewig     01/04/10 00:06:38

  Modified:    docs/manual install.html toc.html
  Added:       docs/manual running.html
  Log:
  Move the "Running Ant" section from "Installing Ant" to a page of its own.
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.6       +0 -99     jakarta-ant/docs/manual/install.html
  
  Index: install.html
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/jakarta-ant/docs/manual/install.html,v
  retrieving revision 1.5
  retrieving revision 1.6
  diff -u -r1.5 -r1.6
  --- install.html	2001/03/09 08:54:34	1.5
  +++ install.html	2001/04/10 07:06:37	1.6
  @@ -197,105 +197,6 @@
   the current Ant version in <code>ANT_HOME</code>.</p>
   
   <hr>
  -<h2><a name="running">Running Ant</a></h2>
  -<p>Running Ant is simple, when you installed it as described in the previous
  -section. Just type <code>ant</code>.</p>
  -<p>When nothing is specified, Ant looks for a <code>build.xml</code>
  -file in the current directory. If found, it uses that file as the
  -buildfile. If you use the <code>-find</code> option,
  -Ant will search for a buildfile in 
  -the parent directory, and so on, until the root of the filesystem 
  -has been reached. To make Ant use
  -another buildfile, use the command-line
  -option <code>-buildfile <i>file</i></code>,
  -where <i>file</i> is the buildfile you want to use.</p>
  -
  -<p>You can also set properties that override properties specified in the
  -buildfile (see the <a href="CoreTasks/property.html">property</a> task). 
  -This can be done with
  -the <nobr><code>-D<i>property</i>=<i>value</i></code></nobr>
option,
  -where <i>property</i> is the name of the property,
  -and <i>value</i> is the value for that property.
  -This can also be used to pass in the value of some environment variables.
  -You can also access environment variables using the <a href="CoreTasks/property.html">
  -property</a> task.
  -
  -Just pass <nobr><code>-DMYVAR=%MYVAR%</code></nobr> (Windows) or
  -<nobr><code>-DMYVAR=$MYVAR</code></nobr> (Unix)
  -to Ant - you can then access
  -these variables inside your buildfile as <code>${MYVAR}</code>.</p>
  -
  -<p>Two more options are: <nobr><code>-quiet</code></nobr>,
  -which instructs Ant to print less
  -information on the console when running, and
  -<nobr><code>-verbose</code></nobr>, which causes Ant to print
  -additional information to the console.</p>
  -
  -<p>It is also possible to specify one or more targets that should be executed.
  -When omitted, the target that is specified in the
  -<code>default</code> attribute of the <code>&lt;project&gt;</code>
tag is
  -used.</p>
  -
  -<p>The <nobr><code>-projecthelp</code></nobr>
  -option gives a list of this project's
  -targets. First those with a description, then those without one.</p>
  -
  -<p>Command-line option summary:</p>
  -<pre>ant [options] [target [target2 [target3] ...]]
  -Options:
  --help                  print this message
  --projecthelp           print project help information
  --version               print the version information and exit
  --quiet                 be extra quiet
  --verbose               be extra verbose
  --debug                 print debugging information
  --emacs                 produce logging information without adornments
  --logfile <i>file</i>          use given file for log output
  --logger <i>classname</i>      the class that is to perform logging
  --listener <i>classname</i>    add an instance of class as a project listener
  --buildfile <i>file</i>        use specified buildfile
  --find <i>file</i>             search for buildfile towards the root of the
filesystem and use the first one found
  --D<i>property</i>=<i>value</i>       set <i>property</i>
to <i>value</i>
  -</pre>
  -<h3>Examples</h3>
  -<blockquote>
  -  <pre>ant</pre>
  -</blockquote>
  -<p>runs Ant using the <code>build.xml</code> file in the current directory,
on
  -the default target.</p>
  -<blockquote>
  -  <pre>ant -buildfile test.xml</pre>
  -</blockquote>
  -<p>runs Ant using the <code>test.xml</code> file in the current directory,
on
  -the default target.</p>
  -<blockquote>
  -  <pre>ant -buildfile test.xml dist</pre>
  -</blockquote>
  -<p>runs Ant using the <code>test.xml</code> file in the current directory,
on a
  -target called <code>dist</code>.</p>
  -<blockquote>
  -  <pre>ant -buildfile test.xml -Dbuild=build/classes dist</pre>
  -</blockquote>
  -<p>runs Ant using the <code>test.xml</code> file in the current directory,
on a
  -target called <code>dist</code>, setting the <code>build</code>
property to the
  -value <code>build/classes</code>.</p>
  -
  -<h3>Running Ant by Hand</h3>
  -<p>If you have installed Ant in the do-it-yourself way, Ant can be started
  -with:</p>
  -<blockquote>
  -  <pre>java -Dant.home=c:\ant org.apache.tools.ant.Main [options] [target]</pre>
  -</blockquote>
  -
  -<p>These instructions actually do exactly the same as the <code>ant</code>
  -command. The options and target are the same as when running Ant with the <code>ant</code>
  -command. This example assumes you have set your classpath to include:</p>
  -<ul>
  -<li><code>ant.jar</code></li>
  -<li>jars/classes for your XML parser</li>
  -<li>the JDK's required jar/zip files</li>
  -</ul>
  -<hr>
   <h2><a name="librarydependencies">Library Dependencies</a></h2>
   <p>The following libraries are needed in your CLASSPATH or in the
   install directory's <code>lib</code> directory if you are using the
  
  
  
  1.5       +1 -0      jakarta-ant/docs/manual/toc.html
  
  Index: toc.html
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/jakarta-ant/docs/manual/toc.html,v
  retrieving revision 1.4
  retrieving revision 1.5
  diff -u -r1.4 -r1.5
  --- toc.html	2001/03/05 13:07:10	1.4
  +++ toc.html	2001/04/10 07:06:37	1.5
  @@ -11,6 +11,7 @@
   <h2>Table of Contents</h2>
   <a href="intro.html">Introduction</a><br>
   <a href="install.html">Installing Ant</a><br>
  +<a href="running.html">Running Ant</a><br>
   <a href="using.html">Using Ant</a><br>
   <a href="coretasklist.html" target="navFrame">Built-in Tasks</a><br>
   <a href="optionaltasklist.html" target="navFrame">Optional Tasks</a><br>
  
  
  
  1.1                  jakarta-ant/docs/manual/running.html
  
  Index: running.html
  ===================================================================
  <html>
  
  <head>
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Language" content="en-us">
  <title>Ant User Manual</title>
  </head>
  
  <body>
  
  <h1>Running Ant</h1>
  <p>Running Ant is simple, when you installed it as described in the previous
  section. Just type <code>ant</code>.</p>
  <p>When nothing is specified, Ant looks for a <code>build.xml</code>
  file in the current directory. If found, it uses that file as the
  buildfile. If you use the <code>-find</code> option,
  Ant will search for a buildfile in 
  the parent directory, and so on, until the root of the filesystem 
  has been reached. To make Ant use
  another buildfile, use the command-line
  option <code>-buildfile <i>file</i></code>,
  where <i>file</i> is the buildfile you want to use.</p>
  
  <p>You can also set properties that override properties specified in the
  buildfile (see the <a href="CoreTasks/property.html">property</a> task). 
  This can be done with
  the <nobr><code>-D<i>property</i>=<i>value</i></code></nobr>
option,
  where <i>property</i> is the name of the property,
  and <i>value</i> is the value for that property.
  This can also be used to pass in the value of some environment variables.
  You can also access environment variables using the <a href="CoreTasks/property.html">
  property</a> task.
  
  Just pass <nobr><code>-DMYVAR=%MYVAR%</code></nobr> (Windows) or
  <nobr><code>-DMYVAR=$MYVAR</code></nobr> (Unix)
  to Ant - you can then access
  these variables inside your buildfile as <code>${MYVAR}</code>.</p>
  
  <p>Two more options are: <nobr><code>-quiet</code></nobr>,
  which instructs Ant to print less
  information on the console when running, and
  <nobr><code>-verbose</code></nobr>, which causes Ant to print
  additional information to the console.</p>
  
  <p>It is also possible to specify one or more targets that should be executed.
  When omitted, the target that is specified in the
  <code>default</code> attribute of the <code>&lt;project&gt;</code>
tag is
  used.</p>
  
  <p>The <nobr><code>-projecthelp</code></nobr>
  option gives a list of this project's
  targets. First those with a description, then those without one.</p>
  
  <p>Command-line option summary:</p>
  <pre>ant [options] [target [target2 [target3] ...]]
  Options:
  -help                  print this message
  -projecthelp           print project help information
  -version               print the version information and exit
  -quiet                 be extra quiet
  -verbose               be extra verbose
  -debug                 print debugging information
  -emacs                 produce logging information without adornments
  -logfile <i>file</i>          use given file for log output
  -logger <i>classname</i>      the class that is to perform logging
  -listener <i>classname</i>    add an instance of class as a project listener
  -buildfile <i>file</i>        use specified buildfile
  -find <i>file</i>             search for buildfile towards the root of the filesystem
and use the first one found
  -D<i>property</i>=<i>value</i>       set <i>property</i>
to <i>value</i>
  </pre>
  <h3>Examples</h3>
  <blockquote>
    <pre>ant</pre>
  </blockquote>
  <p>runs Ant using the <code>build.xml</code> file in the current directory,
on
  the default target.</p>
  <blockquote>
    <pre>ant -buildfile test.xml</pre>
  </blockquote>
  <p>runs Ant using the <code>test.xml</code> file in the current directory,
on
  the default target.</p>
  <blockquote>
    <pre>ant -buildfile test.xml dist</pre>
  </blockquote>
  <p>runs Ant using the <code>test.xml</code> file in the current directory,
on a
  target called <code>dist</code>.</p>
  <blockquote>
    <pre>ant -buildfile test.xml -Dbuild=build/classes dist</pre>
  </blockquote>
  <p>runs Ant using the <code>test.xml</code> file in the current directory,
on a
  target called <code>dist</code>, setting the <code>build</code>
property to the
  value <code>build/classes</code>.</p>
  
  <h3>Running Ant by Hand</h3>
  <p>If you have installed Ant in the do-it-yourself way, Ant can be started
  with:</p>
  <blockquote>
    <pre>java -Dant.home=c:\ant org.apache.tools.ant.Main [options] [target]</pre>
  </blockquote>
  
  <p>These instructions actually do exactly the same as the <code>ant</code>
  command. The options and target are the same as when running Ant with the <code>ant</code>
  command. This example assumes you have set your classpath to include:</p>
  <ul>
  <li><code>ant.jar</code></li>
  <li>jars/classes for your XML parser</li>
  <li>the JDK's required jar/zip files</li>
  </ul>
  <br>
  <hr>
  <p align="center">Copyright &copy; 2000,2001 Apache Software Foundation. All rights
  Reserved.</p>
  
  </body>
  </html>
  
  
  
  

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