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From James Meickle <jmeic...@quantopian.com.INVALID>
Subject Re: Longer term Airflow planning
Date Mon, 15 Apr 2019 16:53:23 GMT
Now that this thread has been open for a minute, I'll loop back to this
with my own thoughts...

I'm not complaining about the overall pace of development. Instead I'd just
like us to discuss how and why that pace is concentrated in bugfixes, UI
tweaks, new operators, and so on. Check out the changelog:
https://airflow.apache.org/changelog.html - there comparatively isn't as
much work going into redesigns of platform features that are painful (or
missing) in Airflow currently like backfill, parametrized on-demand DAGs,
subdags, xcoms, historical DAG definitions, operating/monitoring airflow,
metadata features, etc.

My guess is: working in these areas requires more consensus on what
architectural direction is correct; it's really hard to test "all of
Airflow" (and all its use cases!) for compatibility changes; and it's hard
to merge big PRs that affect a lot of rapidly-moving code. So I'm not
saying that anyone just needs to "work harder", but that we might all
benefit from process changes that incentivize or enable work on deeper
features of Airflow as a platform.

For a suggested process change, I really like some of what Jarek is
proposing. I would certainly find it useful to have a clear contributor
guide. Expecting more from contributors is fine, as long as those
expectations are laid out. If we have firm process expectations, we can
start automating around them.

Another example process change: I think that Airflow development would
benefit from a clearer statement of audience and supported use cases. Is
the goal to focus on being the "best ETL tool", or do we want to support
more diverse scheduling workflows? Are there any workflows that we never
want to support? I see a lot of discussions where the response to changing
a feature is, "It's that way for historical reasons" (often, because it was
for ETL at Airbnb that way). That's not an argument either for or against
keeping it that way, though, so it's really hard to respond to that in
discussion. If we have some statements about user workflows, we can at
least start discussion with a set of principles to point to.

Another example process change: I think that at least Airflow major
versions should have roadmaps, which should match our target audience. The
most recent I can find is two years old!
https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/AIRFLOW/Airflow+2.0 A good
roadmap should be based on evidence of user and developer interest; it
should be updated on a regular cadence with a clear process; and it should
make a convincing case for platform improvements that, by themselves,
wouldn't be worth implementing. It's not just "when will this feature
happen", but "why are features happening in this order" to facilitate
designing something to be more than the sum of its parts.

So... what would it look like to develop features influenced by a roadmap?

An example roadmap goal: what if we wanted Airflow 3.0 to be
container-native, with most deployments occurring on containers? That's not
really a "thing", as there is no one feature that makes something
container-native. But if we called ourselves that it might refer to a lot
of smaller features that, by themselves, aren't as exciting:

- Documentation on a "day one" Airflow installation backed by popular cloud
services like ECS, GKE, etc.
- Documentation of how to deploy an Airflow-compatible, locked-down Docker,
so that people can port existing envs to a local container executor
- A rock-solid Docker Compose workflow for local development of Airflow
- An API for creating DAG-run based ephemeral volumes, which can be
propagated downstream, to support easy migration of "requires local
filesystem" workflows
- Integrating Airflow with container security features (like disallowing
root or capabilities)
- Improved Kubernetes pod logs
- Getting operators runnable in containers without a full Airflow worker
process (possibly even without a DAG sync process)
- Help building containers: at minimum a good official base image and
documentation, but possibly build scripts, or even DAG code to help you
build containers

Here's another goal that's more cross-cutting: what if we wanted Airflow
3.0 to be better for scientific reproducibility? That's pretty broad, but
might mean coming up with a set of features like:

- All executions stored immutably, either built in or as an integration
with a metadata service
- All DAGs and tasks execute in containers, and track container metadata
- Richer metadata/provenance about each task instance
- Each DAGRun saves the DAG version that it was based on / accurate
historical execution info
- Backfills default to using the historical version of the DAG, and have
first-class operations for "recalculate the same DAG with new data" and
"recalculate the same data with a new DAG"

This isn't to say that we will never support these usecases or features,
but that without community decision and guidance, they'll arrive slower or
only in parts. I'm glad that we're a "big tent" software development
project that accepts most PRs, but it's still worthwhile to revise
contribution guidelines and set project goals, because they also shape
community behavior and interest.

On Sat, Apr 13, 2019 at 7:58 AM Jarek Potiuk <Jarek.Potiuk@polidea.com>
wrote:

> Hello Everyone,
>
> Few thoughts which I had after proposing a few changes/PRs/AIPs. I think we
> should not only look at it from the system point of view but also from
> human psychology and emotions point of view :)
>
> * I personally felt pretty demotivated (that's the emotion part) by seeing
> 200 opened PRs and 20 AIPS that you do not know which are actively being
> worked on, which are abandoned which are ideas only etc.
>
> * It becomes much better (I feel enthusiastic emotions for that) with AIPs
> starting getting voted and adopted recently (big +) and the discussions we
> had about mentoring/piloting AIPs but I think we have still too many AIPs
> per committer/PMC member. Hopefully more committers will be added and some
> of the big proposals will get implemented and we will learn all how to get
> from AIP to implementation quickly and maybe it will help with speeding up
> AIP implementation process.
>
> * I feels pretty sad (emotions again) with PRs though. I think I never gone
> past the second page (and some of my PRs are on page 3 or 4 now even if I
> actively work on it now). There is simply no way to classify the PRs now
> easily.
>
> * However I don't think this should be PMC or committer role to classify
> and manage PRs properly. This should be the task of contributor who "owns"
> the PR to make sure that his or her PR is properly "promoted". All the
> nagging and asking people for review and making sure PR is in a good shape
> should be on the side of the person who "owns" it. Otherwise PMC/Committers
> will be swamped by purely administrative tasks which is not the point. The
> system should be designed in the way that it self-manages with the help of
> contributors who should have incentive in managing their PRs properly. I
> sympathise (emotions again) with committers/PMC members that they should
> actually do an interesting work and contribute where their expertise is
> most needed and not loose time for things that are only distractions. So I
> think it should be clear for everyone who is the "owner" of the PR to do
> all the work necessary to drag attention of PMC/committers to take a look
> at their PRs. But it should be clearly stated in Contributors document that
> this is the process and expectation from the contributors. And it should be
> easy for contributors to know who is the best person to contact (that part
> ain't easy now). This is already partially solved by "Recommended" reviewer
> in Github but maybe some guidelines on who from the committers is an expert
> in which areas - this might be super-helpful.
>
> Similarly we should have a clear guidance on how to label the PRs (by the
> owner!!!) and have a rule that requires proper label before reviewer takes
> a look at it. This can even be automated by checks on Travis.
>
> *Proposal 1: have a short overview in CONTRIBUTORS with the committers/PMC
> members and their area of involvement/expertise*
>
> *Proposal 2: have a rule that PR has to be properly labeled in order to get
> committer/PMC member even starts taking a look at it.*
>
> * I think there is a psychological effect that I really like about the
> current way we "do not handle and let rot" some of the PRs. I think it's
> quite in the nature of such open-source project that people will have many
> ideas and some of them will rush in discussing them, proposing sometimes
> even opening draft PR but many of those PRs turn out to be
> not-that-important and the original author abandons them. And that's fine.
> Let those pr to "rot". I think this is how human brain works, that
> sometimes you think about a new idea and you start working on it but when
> it turns out that it's not that important we abandon it and then it is
> fairly difficult to force the author to "clean-up". And that's fine as well
> - we should not expect more from the authors. People just work like that
> and we won't change it in scale. However it's all that stale, inactive PRs
> that are the reason for the "mess" we are experiencing. Why don't we close
> all the stale PRs automatically? There are no drawbacks to that, there is
> the bot that we can easily employ to do that for us:
> https://github.com/probot/stale . There is even explanation in there why
> closing PRs automatically is actually good for contributors (otherwise they
> get false expectations). And as contributor you can always re-open such PR
> easily and effortlessly - marking that the contributor is still interested
> in pushing it forward.
>
> *Proposal 3: employ probot to close stale PRs automatically*
>
> J.
>
>
>
> On Thu, Apr 11, 2019 at 8:12 AM Deng Xiaodong <xd.deng.r@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Some personal thoughts about the PR processing speed specifically.
> >
> > I'm trying to benchmark Airflow with other Apache projects (like Spark,
> > Kafka), in terms of PR reviewing/merging speed: as at this moment, there
> > are 400+ open PRs in Spark and 500+ open PRs in Kafka. On the other hand,
> > there are 26 committers of Kafka and 68 committers of Spark. For Airflow,
> > we have less than 20 committers, and recently the # of open PRs remain at
> > about 200.
> >
> > (highlight: this benchmarking is not 100% precise, as I didn't consider
> the
> > total # of PRs processed per day. But seems the # of commits per day of
> > Kafka is roughly close to Airflow)
> >
> > Don't get me wrong: I never think we have done well enough, and I do
> agree
> > that there is big room for improvement. But to be fair, the situation of
> > Airflow here is not that bad.
> >
> > I was just nominated as a committer about 1 month ago. Earlier as a PR
> > submitter, I also had the feeling "why my PRs are processed so slowly";
> but
> > now when I start to consider more about reviewing/approving/merging, I
> > realize the current pace is fairly good (big thanks to the other
> > committers).
> >
> > Another thing I would like to suggest. Currently we committers almost
> never
> > give "-1" for PRs. Even when committers disagree on a change proposal,
> they
> > don’t close it. I would like to suggest PMC to have this discussion:
> > whether we can close a PR is we have a few "-1"s from committers (say 3
> or
> > 4). I believe this would somehow help.
> >
> >
> > Best regards,
> >
> > XD
> >
> > On Thu, Apr 11, 2019 at 13:54 airflowuser
> > <airflowuser@protonmail.com.invalid> wrote:
> >
> > > 1. Getting more contributes is important but it's also important to
> give
> > > attention to the current contributes.
> > > I noticed that if PR had no reviews and it reached page 3 and above it
> is
> > > likely to be forgotten.
> > > take this one for example:
> > > https://github.com/apache/airflow/pull/4473
> > > The author is required to rebase again. It's not very "welcomey" to new
> > > contributes. There are more open PRs like this. One suggestion might
> be a
> > > monthly status check of all open PRs to see if something was missed?
> > >
> > >
> > > 2. The attention of committers doesn't always pointer to what the
> > > community needs. Check this one
> > > https://github.com/apache/airflow/pull/1936 a problem that bugs many
> > > people but there is no discussion how to solve this. There has been
> more
> > > than 4 releases after this PR was introduced and the problem it tries
> to
> > > fix wasn't addressed nor discussed. The author commented that he can
> > update
> > > the branch but he needs committers to be involved.
> > >
> > > Again, since everything is volunteer base it make sense and
> > understandable
> > > however if the project wishes to get more contributors it might be
> easier
> > > to start with the PRs that we already have rather than putting effort
> on
> > > trying to invite new contributors.
> > >
> > >
> > > ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐
> > > On Thursday, April 11, 2019 3:46 AM, Aizhamal Nurmamat kyzy
> > > <aizhamal@google.com.INVALID> wrote:
> > >
> > > > Hello all,
> > > >
> > > > The Beam project has had problems similar to these also. One of the
> > > things
> > > > they did is formalize how contributions are tracked. I understand
> that
> > > > tracking this sort of information is difficult for the PMC, so if
> > there's
> > > > interest, I'd be happy to work with the PMC to make tools to track
> > > > contributions (e.g. a simple spreadsheet tracking contributions on
> PRs,
> > > > StackOverflow answering, public speaking, documentation, etc). So
> that
> > we
> > > > can streamline the "promotion" of new committers. This may also help
> > > > incentivize "housekeeping" work, such as triaging of JIRA issues,
> > > testing,
> > > > release management, etc.
> > > >
> > > > This may also help provide early feedback to people on track to
> being a
> > > > committer. (e.g. private emails of the kind "hi X. The Airflow PMC
> has
> > > > noticed and appreciates your contributions. We think you could
> improve
> > by
> > > > doing Y or Z"
> > > >
> > > > Let me know what you all think.
> > > >
> > > > Best,
> > > > Aizhamal
> > > >
> > > > On Wed, Apr 10, 2019 at 5:24 PM Gabriel Silk
> gsilk@dropbox.com.invalid
> > > > wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > > A lot of the problems that Quantopian experiences with Airflow
> > can't
> > > be
> > > > > > tackled without either "hacks" on top of Airflow; or deep
> > reworkings
> > > of
> > > > > > Airflow components. But that kind of rework is very challenging
> to
> > > > > > implement with the current Airflow contribution process.
> > > > >
> > > > > Can you elaborate on what some of the problems are that Quantopian
> > has
> > > > > encountered, which would require significant re-work to Airflow to
> > > address?
> > > > > On Wed, Apr 10, 2019 at 8:19 AM Driesprong, Fokko
> > fokko@driesprong.frl
> > > > > wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > Hi James,
> > > > > > Adressing your concerns one by one:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > -   There are a lot of users of Airflow, but their use cases
and
> > > feature
> > > > > >     usage are not well described. Something that seems trivial
or
> > > unnecessary
> > > > > >     to one user turns out to be what someone else's entire
> workflow
> > > depends
> > > > > >     on.
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > I think in general it is all about scheduling stuff. For me,
this
> > is
> > > also
> > > > > > true for many software packages. 80% of the users only use 20%
of
> > the
> > > > > > functionality. I think it is up to the committers to make sure
> that
> > > we
> > > > > > don't remove any functionality too easily, and break the workflow
> > for
> > > > > > others. However, sometimes this is what you want, for example
> > > dropping
> > > > > > Python 2 support. I strongly believe that the flexibility offered
> > by
> > > > > > Airflow is both a strength and a weakness, it allows you to
do
> > > virtually
> > > > > > everything, on the other hand, maybe you should not do that
:-)
> > > > > >
> > > > > > -   The Airflow JIRA feels completely unmaintained. Most of
the
> > > issues I've
> > > > > >     reported have never even been acknowledged, and it's hard
to
> > > know what
> > > > > >     versions an issue applies to. This makes it hard to know
what
> > to
> > > work on
> > > > > >     or
> > > > > >     what would be most impactful to other users.
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Keeping track of Jira is a full-time job. Periodically I go
> through
> > > all
> > > > > > the
> > > > > > tickets, but it is also (mis)used for dumping stack traces,
or
> any
> > > other
> > > > > > error. We should be more strict on this. As a community. If
> you're
> > > > > > interested in doing this, let me know so I can grand you editor
> > > > > > permissions.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > -   Hacking on Airflow is challenging, especially if you need
to
> > run
> > > a real
> > > > > >     workload to examine your changes. (I saw the work for an
> > > improved local
> > > > > >     dev
> > > > > >     process - great stuff!)
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > This is a known problem. I think the community is doing an
> awesome
> > > job
> > > > > > here. For example, Breeze by Polidea (
> > > > > > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffKFHV6f3PQ) and Whirl by
> > > > > > ING/GoDataDriven (
> > > > > >
> > https://blog.godatadriven.com/open-source-airflow-local-development
> > > ).
> > > > > >
> > > > > > -   Keeping track of what's on master vs. what's in a release
is
> > > > > >     challenging,
> > > > > >     particularly since so many commits are for operators we'll
> > never
> > > use. (I
> > > > > >     know there's some discussion about breaking operators into
> > their
> > > own
> > > > > >     repos,
> > > > > >     and I hope that goes through.)
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > The main job of the committers is to keep compatibility on the
> > > > > > interfaces.
> > > > > > The versions are clearly set in Jira when a ticket is being
> worked
> > > on.
> > > > > > Based on if the change is compatible with the new minor version,
> it
> > > will
> > > > > > be
> > > > > > included, otherwise, it will be set to the next major version.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > -   The PMCs are too busy to guarantee timely reviews, and
> rebasing
> > > is
> > > > > >     extremely costly with how much code reorganization is
> > happening.
> > > This
> > > > > >     strongly discourages putting in time to develop anything
> other
> > > than
> > > > > >     relatively isolated features, often new features.
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > The code grew rapidly over time. This required to reorganize
a
> lot
> > of
> > > > > > code.
> > > > > > This is required to keep development possible and make the code
> > more
> > > > > > accessible to newcomers. For example the splitting up of the
> > infamous
> > > > > > models.py (a file with well over 6k lines), was quite a pain
with
> > > > > > circular
> > > > > > imports. This is periodically necessary to keep the code
> organized.
> > > > > > Please
> > > > > > note that it isn't a task for only the PMC to do reviewing.
But
> > this
> > > is
> > > > > > also for the committers and contributors. If there any
> > > functionalities
> > > > > > that
> > > > > > you use a lot, please also provide reviews on that topic.
> > > > > > For me, being committer and PMC on the project is just something
> > > that I
> > > > > > do
> > > > > > out of passion for Airflow. It isn't my job and I don't get
paid
> > for
> > > it.
> > > > > > That being said, I do agree with getting more committers on
board
> > to
> > > > > > strengthen the workforce.
> > > > > > We're now preparing for Airflow 2.0, including a couple of AIP's.
> > The
> > > > > > question if there will be a true container-native, or
> cloud-native
> > > > > > version
> > > > > > of Airflow, is completely up to you and the community. I'm in
> favor
> > > of
> > > > > > jumping on the container train, but this requires to rework
on
> the
> > > > > > codebase
> > > > > > of Airflow.
> > > > > > Cheers, Fokko
> > > > > > Op wo 10 apr. 2019 om 16:56 schreef Szymon Przedwojski <
> > > > > > szymon.przedwojski@polidea.com>:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > I think it is quite clear that Airflow needs more committers.
> > > > > > > Looking at AIPs, PRs and this devlist there are quite a
few
> > active
> > > > > > > people
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > who might be a good fit to become them.
> > > > > > > With the community and the project growing I think this
should
> be
> > > > > > > natural
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > to increase the number of committers as well. I know there
> comes
> > a
> > > new
> > > > > > > committer every now and then, but maybe it’s still not
enough
> and
> > > maybe
> > > > > > > Airflow should recruit them more “aggressively”?
> > > > > > > Szymon Przedwojski
> > > > > > > Polidea | Software Engineer
> > > > > > > M: +48 500 330 790
> > > > > > > E: szymon.przedwojski@polidea.com
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > On 10 Apr 2019, at 16:47, airflowuser <
> > > airflowuser@protonmail.com
> > > > > > > > .INVALID>
> > > > > > > > wrote:
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > The Jira is a mess and it require committers time
to organize
> > it.
> > > > > > > > Ideally users should report issues and committers
should tag
> > them
> > > > > > > > with
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > priority, milestone / fix version, labels (This is how
for
> > example
> > > > > > > it's
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > done with https://github.com/pandas-dev/pandas )
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > When I have time I try to stack list of Jira issues
that
> > require
> > > > > > > > committers attention and ashb fix them but it's progressing
> > > slowly.
> > > > > > > > I think that at least it would be great if the version
field
> in
> > > the
> > > > > > > > Jira
> > > > > > > > will be mandatory when user submit ticket.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > At the end... committers simply don't have time for
this.
> They
> > > don't
> > > > > > > > have enough time for reviewing PRs as well so I doubt
> something
> > > will
> > > > > > > > change
> > > > > > > > in the near future.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐
> > > > > > > > On Wednesday, April 10, 2019 5:18 PM, James Meickle
<
> > > > > > > > jmeickle@quantopian.com.INVALID> wrote:
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > Hi all,
> > > > > > > > > I've been following Airflow development fairly
actively for
> > > over a
> > > > > > > > > year. In
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > that time, the company I work at (Quantopian)
has gone
> all-in
> > > on
> > > > > > > > > Airflow.
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > It's a core part of our business and required
for daily
> > > operations.
> > > > > > > > > However, I've had some concerns over the future
of the
> > > project. Part
> > > > > > > > > of
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > these concerns are because it's difficult to
contribute to
> > > Airflow:
> > > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > -   There are a lot of users of Airflow, but
their use
> cases
> > > and
> > > > > > > > >     feature
> > > > > > > > >
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > usage are not well described. Something that
seems trivial
> or
> > > > > > > > > unnecessary
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > to one user turns out to be what someone else's
entire
> > workflow
> > > > > > > > > depends on.
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > -   The Airflow JIRA feels completely unmaintained.
Most of
> > the
> > > > > > > > >     issues
> > > > > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > I've
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > reported have never even been acknowledged, and
it's hard
> to
> > > know
> > > > > > > > > what
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > versions an issue applies to. This makes it hard
to know
> what
> > > to
> > > > > > > > > work on or
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > what would be most impactful to other users.
> > > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > -   Hacking on Airflow is challenging, especially
if you
> need
> > > to
> > > > > > > > >     run a
> > > > > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > real
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > workload to examine your changes. (I saw the
work for an
> > > improved
> > > > > > > > > local dev
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > process - great stuff!)
> > > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > -   Keeping track of what's on master vs. what's
in a
> release
> > > is
> > > > > > > > >     challenging,
> > > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > particularly since so many commits are for operators
we'll
> > > never
> > > > > > > > > use. (I
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > know there's some discussion about breaking operators
into
> > > their
> > > > > > > > > own
> > > > > > > > > repos,
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > and I hope that goes through.)
> > > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > -   The PMCs are too busy to guarantee timely
reviews, and
> > > rebasing
> > > > > > > > >     is
> > > > > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > extremely costly with how much code reorganization
is
> > > happening.
> > > > > > > > > This
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > strongly discourages putting in time to develop
anything
> > other
> > > > > > > > > than
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > relatively isolated features, often new features.
> > > > > > > > > A lot of the problems that Quantopian experiences
with
> > Airflow
> > > > > > > > > can't
> > > > > > > > > be
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > tackled without either "hacks" on top of Airflow;
or deep
> > > > > > > > > reworkings
> > > > > > > > > of
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > Airflow components. But that kind of rework is
very
> > challenging
> > > > > > > > > to
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > implement with the current Airflow contribution
process.
> > > > > > > > > I'm glad that we've recently adopted AIPs, but
the way
> we're
> > > > > > > > > using
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > them
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > seems better suited to planning isolated features.
The
> > Airflow
> > > > > > > > > project does
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > not have a well-maintained roadmap, nor any mechanism
to
> > > produce
> > > > > > > > > one
> > > > > > > > > by
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > weighing AIPs based on synergy vs. developer
interest vs.
> > user
> > > > > > > > > interest.
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > I think that this lack of long-term planning
makes it even
> > more
> > > > > > > > > challenging
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > to propose larger reworks that might require
multiple AIPs
> to
> > > > > > > > > implement,
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > each of which individually might yield little
benefit. I
> > worry
> > > > > > > > > that
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > we may
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > approve a series of "promising" AIPs that, taken
together,
> > > don't
> > > > > > > > > amount to
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > anything greater than a "pile of new features";
instead of
> > > > > > > > > balancing
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > feature improvements with platform improvements
that will
> > > unlock
> > > > > > > > > more
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > fundamental changes to how Airflow can work.
> > > > > > > > > I'd like to see some discussion of what it would
look like
> to
> > > set
> > > > > > > > > long term
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > goals for Airflow. What is Airflow 2 going to
look like?
> How
> > > much
> > > > > > > > > backwards
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > compat will it break? When should we expect Airflow
3? Are
> > they
> > > > > > > > > going to be
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > "business as usual" releases, or will they embrace
any new
> > > > > > > > > concepts
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > or
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > idioms? Will there be a true container-native,
or
> > cloud-native
> > > > > > > > > version of
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > Airflow? Will we work to be better for current
users, or to
> > > > > > > > > embrace
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > new
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > classes of users?
> > > > > > > > > I have some thoughts of my own, of course, but
I'd like to
> > hear
> > > > > > > > > what
> > > > > > > > > other
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > people have to say on this topic first!
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
>
>
> --
>
> Jarek Potiuk
> Polidea <https://www.polidea.com/> | Principal Software Engineer
>
> M: +48 660 796 129 <+48660796129>
> E: jarek.potiuk@polidea.com
>

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